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Tag: I-1100

Hey, number nerds! Election results by lege district available ?>

Hey, number nerds! Election results by lege district available

If you’re such an election geek that county-by-county results of the 2010 General Election aren’t enough to satisfy your political jones, we have a possible cure: election results broken down by legislative district!

By clicking here, you can see how voters in various lege districts last November voted on the statewide ballot measures, the U.S. Senate race and state Supreme Court contests. Happy calculating!

We’ve got your ballot measure info online ?>

We’ve got your ballot measure info online

If you’re looking for a one-stop place to read up on the six statewide initiatives and the three other ballot measures that will be on this November’s ballot, you’re in luck.

Our State Elections Division has posted a State Measures link on its website. When you click on it and go to one of the ballot measures, you’ll find such features as its ballot title, fiscal impact statement, explanatory statement, and statements for and against it.

The six initiatives that Washington voters will decide this fall are:
• I-1053 would restate existing statutory requirements that legislative actions raising taxes must be approved by two-thirds legislative majorities or receive voter approval, and that new or increased fees require majority legislative approval.
• I-1082 would authorize employers to purchase private industrial insurance beginning July 1, 2012; direct the Legislature to enact conforming legislation by March 1, 2012; and eliminate the worker-paid share of medical-benefit premiums. (more…)

Big bucks: New report shows $20m for initiatives ?>

Big bucks: New report shows $20m for initiatives

The Washington Public Disclosure Commission reports that state initiative efforts have drawn over $20 million in contributions.  This includes the $10 million raised by Stop the Food & Beverage Tax Hikes, promoters of Initiative 1107, which would roll back recently adopted taxes on pop, bottled water, and candy.  Most of the money and in-kind contributions came from the American Beverage Association.

The commission said Washington Citizens for Liquor Reform, backers of I-1105, brought in $2 million from two sources.  This is one of two liquor privatization initiatives. A rival proposal, I-1100 by Modernize Washington, brought in $1.2 million, mostly from Costco.

Washingtonians for Education, Health & Tax Relief, supporting I-1098, raised $1.9 million. The measure would create a high-wage earner state income tax and trim the state property tax and the tax on smaller businesses.

Save Our Jobs Washington, supporting I-1082 to allow private insurance companies to offer workers’ compensation policies, brought in over $1 million.

The PDC said proponents are outpacing opponents by more than 6:1.

In November, Washington voters will decide six citizen initiatives and three measures placed on the ballot by the Legislature.

Initiatives: Why we do random checks ?>

Initiatives: Why we do random checks

After more than three weeks, the State Elections Division’s signature checkers last week finished their work on the six initiatives that were submitted this summer. As expected, all six have qualified for this November’s General Election ballot.

Because all six initiatives turned in such a large number of signatures, each was allowed to undergo a 3 percent sample check instead of a full signature check, greatly expediting the process. Initiative 1107 (repealing taxes on candy, pop, bottled water) collected the most sigs, 408,361. Second was I-1100 (the “Costco” liquor privatization measure) with 395,917. The other four were:
• I-1098 (384,832), creating an income tax on the wealthy and lowering other taxes;
• I-1105 (358,525), the liquor privatization proposal supported by wholesalers;
• I-1082 (345,541), reforming the workers’ compensation system; and
• I-1053 (337,726), restoring the two-thirds voting requirement for the Legislature to raise taxes.

As we blogged about the status of the signature checks, several people asked why we were using a sample check in the first place. Good question. (more…)

Booze on ballot: Make it a double ?>

Booze on ballot: Make it a double

Two liquor privatization measures will appear on the Washington state ballot this year.

The state Elections Division announced Friday afternoon that sponsors for Initiative 1105 submitted enough voter signatures to make the November ballot. Secretary of State Sam Reed is expected to officially certify I-1105 early next week.

Whereas the other liquor privatization proposal, Initiative1100, would let retailers buy liquor stock directly from manufacturers, I-1105 would require use of wholesalers.

I-1105, backed by wholesalers, submitted 358,525 signatures, a large enough cushion to allow a 3 percent random sample check. More than 81 percent of the 10,935 sample signatures were valid – 9,193 were accepted, and 1,742 were rejected. Nearly all of the rejections were because the signers were not registered voters. The error rate was 18.55 percent.

The last of the six initiatives to be checked will be I-1107. That review starts Monday. This measure would repeal new taxes on candy, pop, beer and bottled water. (more…)

Tim Eyman’s I-1053 earns ballot spot ?>

Tim Eyman’s I-1053 earns ballot spot

Initiative activist Tim Eyman and his partners will again appear on the Washington state ballot this year.  Their Initiative 1053, making it harder for Olympia to raise taxes, cleared its last major hurdle on Monday when the state Elections Division announced that the sponsors submitted enough voter signatures to make the November ballot.

I-1053 became the fourth initiative to qualify for the ballot, and two others are widely expected to qualify, too.  That would equal the modern record set in 2000. The all-time record is seven, set in 1914, the first year the initiative process was available.

The I-1053 campaign turned in nearly 338,000 signatures, a large enough pad to allow a 3 percent random test.  More than 80 percent of the 10,325 signatures were valid — 9,187 were accepted and 1,138 were rejected, most because they weren’t registered voters. The error rate was 19.62 percent.

The measure would restore the two-thirds voting requirement for the Legislature to raise taxes. Lawmakers can also refer taxes to the voters.  Lawmakers suspended the supermajority (more…)

`3-way’ workers comp initiative scores fall ballot spot ?>

`3-way’ workers comp initiative scores fall ballot spot

Initiative 1082, a plan to allow private insurers to offer coverage for workplace injuries, is headed for the statewide ballot in Washington this fall.

The state Elections Division completed a 3 percent random check late Tuesday,  finding plenty of valid signatures to assure a spot on the ballot. The campaign had turned in 345,541 signatures, and 10,571 were reviewed, with 9,017 accepted. The others were turned down because no registration could be found for the signer, the signature didn’t match the one on file or there was no usable image on file for the signer, or because they were duplicates.  The error rate was a little above average, 18.9 percent.

Secretary of State Sam Reed will make it official by certifying the measure. The so-called “three-way” proposal, long debated in the Legislature, would allow coverage through the state, private insurers, and self-insurance by large employers. The plan is backed by the politically powerful Building Industry Association of Washington, and opposition also has formed.

This marks the second initiative to make the ballot, and four others are widely expected to qualify, as well, along with three measures previously placed before the voters by the Legislature.  On Monday, Secretary Reed certified I-1100, which would end the state liquor (more…)

I-1100 certified, I-1082 being checked ?>

I-1100 certified, I-1082 being checked

Secretary of State Sam Reed Monday afternoon certified Initiative 1100, the last step for the liquor privatization measure to be placed on this November’s ballot.

Using a random sample method, the I-1100 signature check was completed late Friday afternoon after only two days of work, a day or two sooner than anticipated. As expected, it easily qualified for the fall ballot. One of two liquor initiatives to privatize liquor sales in Washington, the 1100 campaign turned in about 396,000 signatures, way more than the 241,153 valid signatures necessary to make the ballot.

Because of the large number of signatures turned in, I-1100 underwent only a 3 percent random sample check.

Signature checkers began their work Monday morning on Initiative 1082, the BIAW-backed proposal that would allow “three-way” workers’ compensation, with private insurance carriers offering coverage in competition with the state-run program. The 1082 campaign delivered about 345,000 signatures, meaning it will also receive a 3 percent check. State elections officials hope the I-1082 check will be finished on Wednesday.

After the I-1082 check is done, here is the remaining order of initiatives to be examined:
I-1098: Supported by Bill Gates Sr., it would create a state income tax on high-wage earners and would reduce the state share of the property tax and lower the B&O tax on many businesses. (351,000)

I-1053: The Tim Eyman-sponsored measure would re-establish the two-thirds vote requirement for the state Legislature to raises taxes.  It turned in about 330,000 signatures.

I-1105: The other liquor initiative, supported by wholesalers, would take the state out of the liquor retail business. Whereas I-1100 would let retailers buy liquor stock directly from manufacturers, I-1105 would require use of wholesalers.  (359,000)

I-1107: It would repeal new taxes on certain candy, pop, beer and bottled water. Backed by the American Beverage Association, it brought in 395,000 signatures in only three weeks.

The Legislature has sent three other measures to the statewide ballot this fall:

  • Referendum  52 would authorize bonds to finance construction and repair projects increasing energy efficiency in public schools and higher education buildings, and continue the sales tax on bottled water otherwise expiring in 2013.
  • House Joint Resolution 4220, known as the “Lakewood Police Officers Memorial Act,” would amend the state constitution on bail requirements for judges.
  • Senate Joint Resolution 8225 would amend the state constitution relating to debt limits for the state.
I-1100 signature check finished ?>

I-1100 signature check finished

The signature check for Initiative 1100, the liquor privatization measure backed by Costco and other retailers, was completed late Friday afternoon, a couple of days sooner than expected.

Once the I-1100 signature check is certified by Secretary of State Sam Reed, it will be the first initiative to be placed on this November’s ballot.

An initiative needs 241,153 valid voter signatures to qualify for the ballot. However, I-1100, which turned in about 396,000 signatures, qualified for the 3 percent random sample check.

And what did the sample check find? Of the 12,124 signatures sampled, 10,835 (89 percent) were accepted, and 1,289 (11 percent) were found to be invalid for one reason or another.

The next initiative to be checked will be I-1082, the BIAW-backed proposal that deals with workers’ compensation. That check will start Monday morning.

To learn more about the initiative signature checking process, go here .

Checking out I-1100 ?>

Checking out I-1100

I-1100-check-and-I-1082-volume-work-003

Initiative signature-checking season is underway in Olympia. Thursday marked the first day for the first of six initiatives to be checked to see if each one has enough valid signatures to qualify for this November’s ballot.

The first one being examined is Initiative 1100, the liquor privatization measure backed by Costco and other retailers. The I-1100 campaign turned in about 396,000 signatures well before the July 2 deadline to submit petition sheets.

To make it onto the ballot, an initiative needs at least 241,153 valid voter signatures. However, I-1100 qualified for the 3 percent random sample check, which means that just under 12,000 signatures will be reviewed for I-1100. (It appears that the other five initiatives will receive a sample check, too.) Elections officials said they hope to be done with the I-1100 signature check by early next week.

There were 26 signature checkers working on computers today on I-1100, while another 19 workers were busy building volumes for the next measure to be checked, I-1082, the BIAW-backed proposal that deals with workers’ compensation.

The signature checking work is being done at the Thurston County Elections’ ballot-processing center in Tumwater’s Mottman industrial district.

To learn more about the initiative signature checking process, go here.