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Wyman honors World War II writing contest winners ?>

Wyman honors World War II writing contest winners

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Secretary Wyman with three of the World War II writing contest winners (from left), Sajid Amin, Remi Frederick and Elizabeth Min. (Photo courtesy Laura Mott) 

Secretary Wyman has honored four students as state champions in an essay and letter-writing contest marking the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II.

The contest, sponsored by our Legacy Washington program, asked students in grades 8 through 11 to either write a letter to a veteran (living or deceased) or an essay describing what the war means to them. Wyman honored the winners and their families in a special ceremony at the Capitol.

“Even 70 years later, World War II has had an enormous impact on our world and older generations,” Wyman said. “This contest encourages students to explore the war and learn how it impacted their older relatives, and what the war meant to themselves. So many of the letters and essays were thoughtful and revealing. I congratulate all of the students who took part.”

This contest winners are:
• Remi Frederick, an eighth-grader at Columbia Junior High School in Federal Way. Remi’s letter is called “A Letter of Life.”
• Sajid Amin, a freshman at North Thurston High School in Lacey. Sajids’ essay is entitled “What WWII Means to Me.”
• Elizabeth Min, a sophomore at Decatur High School in Federal Way. Elizabeth’s essay is called “It Took a War to Bring My Family Together.”
• June Lin, a junior at Snohomish High School in Snohomish. June’s essay is “Six Long Years.”

Frederick, Amin and Min and their families attended an awards ceremony in Wyman’s office Wednesday. Lin was unable to attend. Each of the four champions received a certificate of appreciation and a $100 Fred Meyer gift card from Wyman.

Winners of World War II writing contest announced ?>

Winners of World War II writing contest announced

L to R_Bob Hart, Eddie Meingasher, John Bonner. Texas Twibell in window

Four Washington students have been named state champions in an essay and letter-writing contest marking the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II.

The competition, sponsored by the Office of Secretary of State’s Legacy Washington program, asked students in grades 8 through 11 to either write a letter to a veteran (living or deceased) or an essay describing what the war means to them.

This year’s winners (and the names of their letters/essays) are:
8th grade: Remi Frederick (Columbia Junior High School, Federal Way) – “A Letter of Life”
9th grade: Sajid Amin (North Thurston High School, Lacey) – “What WWII means to me”
10th grade: Elizabeth Min (Decatur High School, Federal Way) – “It took a war to bring my family together”
11th grade: June Lin (Snohomish High School, Snohomish) – “Six Long Years”

Go here to read the winning students’ pieces.

The four students, along with their teachers and families, will be invited to Secretary of State Wyman’s office on Tuesday, Feb. 2, at 3:30 p.m. to receive a certificate of appreciation and a $100 gift card sponsored by Fred Meyer.

“So many of the submitted letters and essays were very thoughtful and well-written,” said Wyman, who was part of a panel of judges reviewing the entries. “Some of them were personal and moving, while others focused on the war’s enormous impact. I congratulate all of the students who took part.”

The winning essays will be posted on the Secretary of State’s website, featured in OSOS publications and appear alongside the Washington Remembers exhibit, which focuses on Washingtonians who served in the war.

Library tourney quarterfinal #4: Asahel Curtis photos vs. Dr. Seuss booklet on malaria ?>

Library tourney quarterfinal #4: Asahel Curtis photos vs. Dr. Seuss booklet on malaria

Our fourth and final quarterfinal of the Library Jewels tourney is here: a collection of photos by Asahel Curtis and others going up against a Dr. Seuss World War II booklet on malaria. The winner will advance to the tourney semis next week. You can vote for your favorite just by using the online poll below. The poll closes Thursday at 9 a.m., so don’t forget to vote!

Dr. Seuss World War II booklet on malaria

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Collection of photos by Asahel Curtis, others
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Which of these Library Jewels do you like best?

  • Dr. Seuss World War II booklet on malaria (61%)
  • Collection of photos by Asahel Curtis, others (39%)

Total Voters: 57

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Dr. Seuss malaria booklet bounds to second round ?>

Dr. Seuss malaria booklet bounds to second round

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There must be many Dr. Seuss fans among voters taking part in our Library Jewels tourney. The World War II booklet by the famous children’s author scored a resounding win over a 1924 Washington road map, 66 percent to 34 percent. The booklet advances to the second round, where it will face a collection of photos by Asahel Curtis and others. We’ll start the tourney’s second round this afternoon with a nearly-500-year-old rare atlas facing a 1910 photo album of northwestern Washington.

Library tourney Game 8: Dr. Seuss malaria booklet vs. 1924 WA road map ?>

Library tourney Game 8: Dr. Seuss malaria booklet vs. 1924 WA road map

We’ve finally reached the eighth and final game of the first round of the Library Jewels tourney. It’s a World War II booklet on malaria by Dr. Seuss against a 1924 road map of Washington. Wanna vote? Just use the online poll below. You have until Friday at 10 a.m. to vote, so don’t miss out!

Dr. Seuss World War II booklet on malaria

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1924 Washington road map

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Which of these Library Jewels do you like best?

  • Dr. Seuss World War II booklet on malaria (67%)
  • 1924 Washington road map (33%)

Total Voters: 60

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Student writing contest on World War II ends Nov. 20 ?>

Student writing contest on World War II ends Nov. 20

L to R_Bob Hart, Eddie Meingasher, John Bonner. Texas Twibell in window

(Photo courtesy Legacy Washington)

Washington students in grades 8 through 11 have until Nov. 20 to take part in an essay and letter-writing contest about World War II.

The competition, sponsored by the Office of Secretary of State’s Legacy Washington program, asks students to either write a letter to a veteran (living or deceased) or an essay describing what World War II means to them.

“This is a great opportunity for students interested in World War II or who had relatives who served in the war,” Secretary of State Kim Wyman said. “This war had an enormous impact on our country and generations of Americans. So many of today’s students have ancestors who fought or served in the war.  I encourage students to take part in the contest and share their thoughts on the war.”

Essays/letters can’t be more than 500 words. Students turning in entries should include their teacher’s name, teacher’s score, student name, school name, grade and school district.

Winners from each of the four grades will be chosen by a panel of judges at the start of the 2016 legislative session. A winner from each grade will be selected and invited to a ceremony in Secretary Wyman’s office and presented with a special certificate and a $100 gift card. Winning essays or letters will be posted on the Secretary of State’s website, featured in SOS publications and appear alongside the Washington Remembers exhibit, which focuses on Washingtonians who served in the war.

For more information about the contest, please go here or contact Legacy Washington’s Laura Mott at laura.mott@sos.wa.gov or (360) 902-4171.

Writing contest on World War II under way ?>

Writing contest on World War II under way

L to R_Bob Hart, Eddie Meingasher, John Bonner. Texas Twibell in window

(Photo courtesy of Legacy Washington)

To help mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, Washington students in grades 8 through 11 are invited to take part in an essay and letter-writing contest.

The competition, sponsored by the Office of Secretary of State’s Legacy Washington program, asks students to either write a letter to a veteran (living or deceased) or an essay describing what World War II means to them.

“This is a great opportunity for students interested in World War II or who had relatives who served in the war,” Secretary of State Kim Wyman said. “This war had an enormous impact on our country and generations of Americans. So many of today’s students have ancestors who fought or served in the war. I encourage students to take part in the contest and share their thoughts on the war.”

The contest deadline is Nov. 20. Essays/letters can’t be more than 500 words. Students turning in entries should include their teacher’s name, teacher’s score, student name, school name, grade and school district. For more information about the contest, please go here or contact Legacy Washington’s Laura Mott at laura.mott@sos.wa.gov or (360) 902-4171.

Winners from each of the four grades will be chosen by a panel of judges at the start of the 2016 legislative session. A winner from each grade will be selected and invited to a ceremony in Secretary Wyman’s office and presented with a special certificate and a $100 gift card. Winning essays or letters will be posted on the Secretary of State’s website, featured in SOS publications and appear alongside the Washington Remembers exhibit, which focuses on Washingtonians who served in the war.

Secretary Wyman honors our Greatest Generation vets ?>

Secretary Wyman honors our Greatest Generation vets

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Marine veteran Clayton Pitre speaks at the launch ceremony for a new exhibit focusing on Washingtonians who served in World War II. (Photo courtesy of Benjamin Helle)

Marking the 70th anniversary of VJ Day that ended World War II, the Secretary of State has launched a new exhibit that features GIs in some of the most vicious fighting of the conflict, survivors of the Nazi death camps and minorities who encountered racism during the war. A dozen stories take visitors from the beaches of Normandy on D-Day to the awful winter of the Battle of the Bulge to postwar Japan and the aftermath of the atomic bomb.

“Washington Remembers: Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom,” is the vision of Kim Wyman, the Secretary of State. Wyman’s uncle, Cpl. John Dobbs, received a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart in the conflict.

“World War II united Americans in an unparalleled way,” Wyman said. “These stories give gripping detail and the lessons in them should find their way into every classroom and library.”

The free, privately funded exhibit was launched Thursday, and follows nine online profiles that offer fresh insight into the war. Wyman’s Legacy Washington staff created the exhibit and online profiles. (UPDATE: TVW says it will air the exhibit launch tonight at 8:30, Sunday at 6 p.m. and Monday at 6 p.m.)

Deputy Secretary Greg Lane and historian John Hughes emceed a launch event in the Legislative Building’s State Reception Room, saluting the courage of the service members and civilians in sharing their painful experiences. Future generations need to know, and remember those stories, they said.

“It took decades for many veterans to speak openly about the war,” Wyman said earlier. “And we’re losing them every day. I’m delighted that we’ve documented, for history’s sake, the trials and victories in a war that changed who we are.”

Speakers included Clayton Pitre, one of the first African Americans to serve in the U.S. Marine Corps since the Revolution; John Robert LaViriere, a mortar gunner with the U.S. Army who detailed the life of a GI in letters he faithfully sent home; and Henry Freidman, a Jewish man from Poland who hid in a barn loft to avoid the Nazi death camps.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and his husband, Michael Shiosaki, attended to honor Michael’s father, Fred Shiosaki, and a throng of friends and family and history buffs joined the festivities.

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Some of the panels of the Washington Remembers exhibit.

The exhibit features the following 12 Washingtonians:

Les Amundson, a B-17 bomber pilot who spent 18 months in captivity after his plane was shot down over the Netherlands.

Henry Friedman, who, as a Jewish teen, evaded the Nazis for 18 months in small barn loft in Poland.

Robert Graham,  Washington’s former seven-term state auditor who was a flight engineer on cargo planes that few far across the Pacific during the war.

Bob Hart, an Army paratrooper who fought in Italy, France and the horrific Battle of the Bulge in Belgium.

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Marine veteran Stan Jones stands in front of the exhibit panel about him. (Photo courtesy of Benjamin Helle)

Stan Jones, a Tulalip tribal leader who, as a Marine, served in the South Pacific and later watched Japanese orphans scavenge trash cans for food after an atomic bomb destroyed much of Nagasaki.

John Robert LaRiviere, a mortar gunner in the U.S. Army who spent the winter of 1945 in a foxhole during the Battle of the Bulge.

Joe Moser, a fighter pilot who was shot down over France and later survived eight months of captivity and was released from Buchenwald concentration camp days before his rumored execution.

George Narozonick, a Navy sailor who was part of the massive D-Day invasion at Normandy in 1944.

Clayton Pitre, who trained at a segregated base during the war and landed at Okinawa in 1945 as one of the first African American Marines since the American Revolution.

Arnold Samuels, who escaped Germany with his family in 1937 only to return there as an Army Counter Intelligence Corps operative near the war’s end and helped liberate the Nazi concentration camp at Dachau.

Fred Shiosaki, a Japanese American who served with the U.S. Army’s legendary 442nd Regimental Combat Team in Europe.

Regina Tollfeldt, one of 15,000 women who worked in Boeing’s Seattle factories during the war.

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World War II-era Boeing worker Regina Tollfeldt in front of her exhibit panel. (Photo courtesy of Benjamin Helle)

 

Wyman speaks at event marking end of World War II ?>

Wyman speaks at event marking end of World War II

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Secretary Wyman speaks at the “Spirit of ’45” event marking the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. (Photos courtesy of Benjamin Helle)

Secretary of State Wyman joined a handful of World War II veterans, officials with the state Department of Veterans Affairs and others during a special ceremony Friday morning at the state’s World War II Memorial to mark the 70th anniversary of the war’s end. World War II ended on August 14, 1945, when Japan surrendered.

During the “Spirit of ’45” ceremony on the Capitol Campus, Wyman spoke poignantly of her uncle, who served in the war. She also told the audience about some of the heroic veterans profiled in the new exhibit about World War II that her Legacy Washington team has produced.

The exhibit, called Washington Remembers, officially opens next Thursday during a ceremony beginning at 3 p.m. in the State Reception Room at the Capitol. The exhibit itself is found in the front lobby of the Office of Secretary of State, located on the second floor of the Capitol. The public is invited to attend the launch event and view the exhibit, which features panels focusing on 12 Washingtonians who served in the war.

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Secretary Wyman stands with (from left) Washington Department of Veterans Affairs Deputy Director Gary Condra, WDVA Director Alfie Alvarado-Ramos, Steve Heinen, James Heinen and Lt. Commander Matthew Bayer, a naval aviator representing Navy Region Northwest. They are next to the newly unveiled plaque of William Heinen, who was killed on Sept. 15, 1944, while serving as a naval aviator. Steve and James Heinen are William’s nephew and brother, respectively. 

Latest WWII profile on our own`Rosie the Riveter’ ?>

Latest WWII profile on our own`Rosie the Riveter’

Regina-Tollfeldt-CoverThe latest World War II profile by our Legacy Washington team focuses on a 92-year-old Olympia resident who is one of the last of about 15,000 women who worked in Boeing’s Seattle factories during the war.

Regina Sawina Tollfeldt worked eight hours a day, seven days a week during the peak of the war, wriggling through the wing jigs for the B-17s leaving Plant No. 2 at a rate of a dozen a day. Tollfeldt’s job was to drill the holes for the rivets that fastened the bomber’s aluminum skin to its ribs.

Her name is pronounced “Reg-eena Sah-Veena Toll-felt,” with a strong “g” and “v” and a silent “d.” “Sawina” in Poland is pronounced “Sah-Veena,” she explains.

You can view her online profile here.

Tollfeldt’s story, written by John C. Hughes, is part of “Washington Remembers,” a project of Legacy Washington to salute World War II veterans as the 70th anniversary of war’s end approaches. The Washington Remembers webpage can be viewed here.

Secretary of State Kim Wyman, who is the niece of a decorated World War II Marine, says the profile on Tollfeldt is a reminder of the crucial role women played on the homefront of the war effort.

“Regina and thousands of other Washington women went to work in factories to help with the war effort,” Wyman said. “They may have been nicknamed ‘Rosie the Riveter,’ but to me they should all be called heroines for stepping up and helping build the planes and other equipment that helped us win the war.”

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Regina Tollfeldt talks with Assistant Secretary of State Mark Neary at a recent reception. (Photo courtesy of Laura Mott)

Assistant Secretary of State Mark Neary chatted with Tollfeldt at a recent reception in Wyman office honoring Hughes’ 50-year (and counting) career as a journalist and historian.

“It was so interesting to talk with Regina and learn more about her role in the war. What an amazing woman and story.”

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An unidentified woman works on a plane at a Boeing plant during World War II. (Photo courtesy of Legacy Washington)

After World War II ended, Tollfeldt started with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in Olympia as a secretary and ended her career in Aberdeen 32 years later as one of the division’s most respected counselors.

Regina and her husband, Roy, moved to Olympia in 1980. Roy died in 1999. Regina is an accomplished painter and for several years was an active member of Women in Black, the international group that abhors violence and militarism.

Legacy Washington is getting ready to launch a profile next week on Olympia’s George Narozonick, who hit the beaches on D-Day, June 6, 1944.