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Tag: Gov. Arthur Langlie

Governors’ executive orders over the years

Governors’ executive orders over the years

  Gov. Dixy Lee Ray issued several executive orders in 1980 that related to the Mount St. Helens eruption. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Archives) They might lack the authority and consensus of legislatively approved state laws, but executive orders are a powerful way that Washington’s governors have made things happen in state government over the years. Executive orders are formal orders issued by the governor, generally to cabinet agencies statewide, requiring that certain actions be taken. They may have…

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From the Archives: Remembering Pearl Harbor

From the Archives: Remembering Pearl Harbor

(Images courtesy Washington State Archives) Dec. 7 marks the 72nd anniversary of the attack on the U.S. Navy fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Gov. Inslee has ordered that flags at the Capitol and all state facilities be lowered to half-staff for National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. In memory of the event that catapulted America into World War II, the State Archives has brought out some historic documents related to the attack. Above is a telegram sent on Dec. 7, 1941,…

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From the Archives: Classic photos of govs signing bills

From the Archives: Classic photos of govs signing bills

(Photos courtesy of Washington State Digital Archives.) Since it’s Gov. Jay Inslee’s first “bill-signing season,” we’re getting in the spirit of things by digging deep into the State Archives for photos of previous Washington governors putting pen to paper and turning bills into law. Earlier, we blogged about photos of bill-signing souvenir pens used by earlier guvs. Here are photos of two governors who occupied the northeast corner of the second floor of the Capitol back when radio and newspapers…

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Don’t be a Grinch! Vote in Archives treasures poll!

Don’t be a Grinch! Vote in Archives treasures poll!

For many, the past week already has been busy and memorable, thanks to holiday-related shopping and family get-togethers, and, of course, the Seahawks pummeling the 49ers on national TV to clinch a playoff spot. And, depending on whether you cheer for the UW or WSU, you either were bummed or delighted that the Huskies lost a nail-biter to Boise State in the Las Vegas Bowl. If all of the recent pigskin and yuletide action hasn’t worn you out, here is…

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Archives treasure #2: Pearl Harbor telegrams

Archives treasure #2: Pearl Harbor telegrams

Dec. 7 marked the 71st anniversary of the Japanese attack on the U.S. Navy fleet stationed in Pearl Harbor and other American military installations nearby. A day after the attack in Hawaii, the United States declared war on Japan. Starting just hours following the Pearl Harbor attack, Washington Gov. Arthur Langlie received a series of telegrams from the U.S. War Department. These telegrams are the second Archives treasure for December. Archives treasures is a monthly blog feature in which we…

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October Archives treasure #1: Gov. Evans’ Rainier climb

October Archives treasure #1: Gov. Evans’ Rainier climb

(Photos courtesy of Washington State Archives) Dan Evans is a double-rarity in Evergreen State politics. He’s one of only two Washington governors to serve three terms (the other, Seattle Republican Arthur Langlie, occupied the Governor’s Office in 1941-45 and 1949-57). Evans also is one of only two people who was both Washington Governor and a U.S. Senator from our state (Mon Wallgren, an Everett Democrat, was the other, having served in the U.S. Senate from 1940 until 1945, when he…

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May Archives treasure #2: Japanese internment records

May Archives treasure #2: Japanese internment records

One of the most controversial occurrences stateside during World War II was the internment of Japanese Americans following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. The State Archives has a collection of documents related to internment of Washingtonians of Japanese descent. This collection is the second item featured for May’s Archives treasures online poll. These records come from the Washington State Planning Council’s War and Post-War Planning Files, 1942-1945. The record series includes surveys and plans pertaining…

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April Archives treasures winner is…

April Archives treasures winner is…

The final results are in. The winner of April’s “Archives treasures” contest is the cross-sound bridge plans, with 44 percent of the vote. Washington’s first territorial law took second with 32 percent, and Gov. Arthur Langlie’s prepared proclamation in 1956 calling for a state of emergency in case of a nuclear attack finished third with 24 percent. Look for the next round of the “State Library jewels” online contest here in the coming days.   Please follow and like us:

Vote for your favorite April Archives treasure!

Vote for your favorite April Archives treasure!

Over the past several days, we’ve shown off the three Archives treasures featured in our April online contest. The three contenders this month are 1) the cross-sound bridge plans, 2) the first territorial law, and 3) the prepared emergency proclamation by Gov. Arthur Langlie in case of a nuclear attack. Since our office strongly supports voting, we’d love for you to take part in our online poll by choosing which of these Archives treasures you like best. The poll closes…

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Giving thanks 60 years ago

Giving thanks 60 years ago

Face it. For many of us, Thanksgiving is one of two scenarios: 1)    You frantically prepare a huge dinner (“Hey, is that turkey ready yet?!”) and clean up the house before the relatives and/or friends invade, then chitchat with them or sneak away to watch some football on TV in another room until the turkey is done, and then everyone stuffs their faces full while someone reminds your brother of something mean and cruel that he did to you 40…

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