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From Digital Archives: photos of 1889 Seattle Fire

From Digital Archives: photos of 1889 Seattle Fire

When you ask the historical significance of June 6, most people think of the anniversary of D-Day. But June 6 also marks a horrific event in Seattle history. On that date in 1889, a fire destroyed much of Seattle, which was then a timber town and many years from becoming a world-famous city. Our Legacy Washington program’s exhibit on the year when Washington reached statehood, “Washington 1889: Blazes, Rails and Year of Statehood,” includes a section on the 1889 Great…

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From the Archives: Marlon Brando and the “fish-ins”

From the Archives: Marlon Brando and the “fish-ins”

Seattle P-I story in March 1964 about Marlon Brando being arrested on charges of illegal fishing. (Image courtesy of Washington State Archives) Many people associate Marlon Brando for starring in movie classics like ”A Streetcar Named Desire” and ”The Godfather.” But many Native Americans and followers of the Northwest “fish wars” from the 1960s and ‘70s remember Brando for standing alongside tribal leaders to protest the denial of their treaty rights for fishing. It was 50 years ago this week…

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Remembering Boldt Decision 40 years later

Remembering Boldt Decision 40 years later

Judge Boldt (Photo courtesy of Washington State Historical Society) Wednesday marks the 40th anniversary of a landmark tribal fishing rights ruling by a federal judge that pleased Native Americans and shocked and angered non-Indian fishermen around the Northwest. The polarizing decision unleashed both celebrations and protests on Washington rivers. Major court opinions rarely carry the name of the judge, but the case U.S. v. Washington is commonly known as the Boldt Decision, after George Hugo Boldt (right), a federal district…

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Farewell to Native exhibit, hello to Quilts of Valor

Farewell to Native exhibit, hello to Quilts of Valor

Staff carefully remove panels from the Native Indian tribe exhibit. The Office of the Secretary of State has packed up the Northwest Indian tribe exhibit and soon will be hanging the new exhibit, “Quilts of Valor,” honoring our veterans. The Northwest Indian tribe exhibit, created by the Washington State Heritage Center, part of the Office of the Secretary of State, will continue to be displayed throughout Washington state. Starting in August, the exhibit, “We’re Still, Here, The Survival of Washington…

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Native American exhibit leaving Capitol after June 14

Native American exhibit leaving Capitol after June 14

The first exhibit on Northwest Indian tribes ever displayed at the Capitol will be coming down after June 14, but will soon appear elsewhere in Washington for all to see. The exhibit about Washington’s Native Americans has been on display in the front lobby of the Office of Secretary of State for the past year. The free and privately funded exhibit, called “We’re Still Here, The Survival of Washington Indians,” can be seen weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m….

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Our new Native American exhibit is up!

Our new Native American exhibit is up!

Over the past couple of weeks, some of our staffers have shown off their interior design and home improvement skills as they’ve transformed our office’s front lobby. The sounds of hammers and power drills have been commonplace, as have scenes of co-workers standing high on ladders to remove displays and patch holes in walls. All of this has been done to take down one interesting exhibit and replace it with another that is sure to capture the attention and amazement…

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