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Author: Secretary of State's Office

Discover unique collections in Washington libraries

Discover unique collections in Washington libraries

From our standpoint here at the Washington State Library, one of the best things about this summer’s Washington Library Passport Project is that every week, we learn interesting and unique things about the libraries in Washington. Everyone knows about the spectacular architecture of Seattle’s flagship branch, but often our small libraries fly under the radar. By encouraging people to visit Washington libraries and post about something they’ve learned during their visit, all sorts of interesting stories have emerged. This morning,…

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Reality Check

Reality Check

From the Desk of Joe Olayvar If you haven’t noticed, there’s a device craze going on.  Nearly everywhere you look in any town or city across the globe, someone is absorbed in conversation, web searching, or game play.  Yes, we’ve come a long way since the Atari or the early phone and its five pound battery pack.  But like every technology, there’s always something new that will eventually overshadow it, or at least add a new facet; in this case,…

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Announcing the winners of our 3rd Annual Zine contest!

Announcing the winners of our 3rd Annual Zine contest!

How many of us remember sitting through dry history classes in school?  And yet history done right is a fascinating and important subject.  Here at the Washington State Library we take history seriously.  One of our strategic goals is to “Preserve and share Washington’s stories.” We have several paths to achieving this goal. There are our historic digital newspapers, the digitized “Classics in Washington History” collection, our collection of Historic maps, and the  Washington Rural Heritage Collection.  But making the resources…

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Beekeepers at the Airway Heights Corrections Center

Beekeepers at the Airway Heights Corrections Center

From the desk of Sue Box, Library Associate at the Airway Heights Corrections Center. On February 15, I had the pleasure and privilege of watching sixteen men be congratulated on a one-of-a-kind accomplishment.  About two years ago, Mr. Jim Miller, a master beekeeper and longtime member of the West Plains Beekeepers Association, decided to give of himself and his time to help the prison really get the beekeeping program going.  He helped set up hives, he taught the brand new…

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Veterans in Washington – Creating a Stronger Library Connection

Veterans in Washington – Creating a Stronger Library Connection

From the desk of Jeff Martin, Manager, Library Development, Washington State Library I didn’t realize how many veterans, active duty and reserve personnel, and their family members exist in Washington State. The Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) reports the figure as roughly 2.6 million persons. That means one in every three of us in Washington is a veteran, on active duty, in the reserve, or a family member of a veteran, active duty and reserve military member. Veterans…

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All Aboard for Storytime!

All Aboard for Storytime!

From the desk of Carolyn Petersen In the spirit of it takes a village to raise a child Washington libraries offer preschool storytimes because attending storytime has been proven to increase the kindergarten readiness skills a child needs. This spring the Washington State Library will debut a series of trainings, All Aboard for Kindergarten, around the state.  The trainings are intended to strengthen youth services staff skills around the five key early literacy practices. Sing, talk, read, write and play…

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“Connecting Washington through the power of libraries”

“Connecting Washington through the power of libraries”

Our mission statement is a short and simple, yet powerful statement of what we do here at the Washington State Library.  We see ourselves as an umbrella that hovers over all the wonderful libraries in our state, offering unique resources, expertise, training opportunities and grants which help you fulfill our common goal: to provide excellent service to our states residents.  We look with amazement at all that happens in our state; the programs, resources and support you each provide to…

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Archives Spotlight: Hungry for wealth, ‘starvation healer’ ran deadly Olalla clinic

Archives Spotlight: Hungry for wealth, ‘starvation healer’ ran deadly Olalla clinic

Dr. Linda Burfield Hazzard was an infamous fraud and a crook. She was known for her starvation “cure.” Dr. Hazzard purported fasting was the only cure for disease under the theory all illnesses were borne of impaired digestion. Unsurprisingly, a lot of Hazzard’s patients died slow, miserable deaths. These patients also had a weird habit of signing over their estates to Dr. Hazzard shortly before dying. What’s even more surprising? The ill continued to undergo fasting treatment despite her fairly…

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How your donations to the Institutional Libraries makes a difference.

How your donations to the Institutional Libraries makes a difference.

The Clallam Bay Corrections Center is trying something different.  They are reconsidering the usefulness of solitary confinement.  According to an article in the Seattle Times, “Being alone in your own head 23 hours a day in a 48-square-foot poured-concrete cell makes, inmates say, the mad madder and the bad even worse.”  Clallam Bay is using a new approach to navigating the intervention of behavioral barriers, developing a program called the “Intensive Transition Program (ITP)” and the library is a contributing…

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Archives Spotlight: Seattle’s first retail store sat on Alki Point

Archives Spotlight: Seattle’s first retail store sat on Alki Point

“That’ll be six dollars,” Charles C. Terry probably said to J. N. Low on November 28, 1851. Low bought two axes from Terry, the first sale at Seattle’s first store, located in the town of New York, which is now known as Alki Point. The next time you tell yourself Seattle is super expensive, remember this sale. Six dollars in 1851 is roughly $180 in 2018. Pretty steep for a couple of axes, right? Then again, I haven’t checked prices…

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