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Category: Legacy Washington

From Digital Archives: photos of 1889 Seattle Fire

From Digital Archives: photos of 1889 Seattle Fire

When you ask the historical significance of June 6, most people think of the anniversary of D-Day. But June 6 also marks a horrific event in Seattle history. On that date in 1889, a fire destroyed much of Seattle, which was then a timber town and many years from becoming a world-famous city. Our Legacy Washington program’s exhibit on the year when Washington reached statehood, “Washington 1889: Blazes, Rails and Year of Statehood,” includes a section on the 1889 Great…

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Legacy Washington honors those with ties to Korea

Legacy Washington honors those with ties to Korea

As it prepares for the September launch of its new online program and exhibit called “Korea 65: The Forgotten War Remembered,” our Legacy Washington team gathered about 40 people who are either Korean Americans or connected to the Korean War. They included veterans and people displaced by the war. The group met at the Korean War Memorial on the Capitol Campus in Olympia Monday for photographs, followed by an honorees reception in Secretary of State Kim Wyman’s office and a…

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Daughters of American Revolution added to LegacyMakers

Daughters of American Revolution added to LegacyMakers

As the saying goes, one good turn deserves another. In 2015, the Sacajawea Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) approached our Legacy Washington program about volunteering in some capacity. The DAR chapter, based in Olympia, was working on a project to gather all of the biographical information on the Washington State Regents, the women who head the DAR in the state, since its inception in 1894. After accepting DAR’s offer, Legacy Washington soon thought it would be…

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Historic Washington women: Adele Ferguson and Nancy Evans

Historic Washington women: Adele Ferguson and Nancy Evans

One was so well-known (and feared) by lawmakers and others around the Capitol Campus that you could refer to her by just her first name. The other became the youngest first lady in state history, and is credited with resurrecting a “drafty old” Governor’s Mansion. They are legendary Bremerton Sun reporter and columnist Adele Ferguson and beloved former first lady Nancy Evans, wife of three-term Gov. Dan Evans. Both women were subjects of Legacy Washington biographies and oral histories written…

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Historic Washington women: Jennifer Dunn and Jolene Unsoeld

Historic Washington women: Jennifer Dunn and Jolene Unsoeld

Harley Soltes / The Seattle Times But Jennifer Dunn and Jolene Unsoeld shared something in common. Each one, in her own way, influenced Washington’s political landscape before even taking office in Congress. In 1981, Dunn became the first female chair of the Washington State Republican Party, a position she held for 11 years before being elected to the 8th Congressional District seat in 1992. During her time in D.C., Dunn became the highest-ranking woman in Congress as vice chair of…

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Historic Washington women: Lillian Walker and Bonnie Dunbar

Historic Washington women: Lillian Walker and Bonnie Dunbar

Civil rights pioneer Lillian Walker (Photos courtesy of Legacy Washington) March is Women’s History Month, and you don’t have to look far to find amazing and in-depth stories about notable Washington women who have left their mark. We’re proud that our Legacy Washington team has produced several outstanding biographies and oral histories on women who were trailblazers in one way or another. We’re remembering two pioneering women, one in civil rights, the other in space exploration. Long before Martin Luther…

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“Who Are We?” contest winners honored

“Who Are We?” contest winners honored

Secretary Wyman with the “Who Are We?” contest winners in her office. (Photo courtesy of Laura Mott) Visiting the state Capitol in Olympia is a fun and memorable experience by itself. But if you’re a student and getting an award during your visit, it’s unforgettable. That was the case for five Washington students who were honored by Secretary of State Wyman in her office Thursday for being the top chosen winners for the “Who Are We?” writing, art and film…

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Hey, I don’t see Benton County on this map!

Hey, I don’t see Benton County on this map!

1904 Washington map. (Image courtesy of Legacy Washington)  Anyone who is really into Washington geography knows that our state has 39 counties. But did you know that hasn’t always been the case? There was a time when a few of today’s counties weren’t even around at the turn of the 20th century. This 1904 map of Washington offers visual proof. What is now Benton County was part of Yakima and Klickitat counties. Douglas County was A LOT larger in 1904…

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“Who Are We?” contest winners announced

“Who Are We?” contest winners announced

Winning artwork by Emilie Haedt, an eighth-grader at Tacoma’s Annie Wright School. (Image courtesy Legacy Washington) Five Washington students have been named state champions in a writing, art and film contest sponsored by the Office of Secretary of State’s Legacy Washington  program, which produced  the “Who Are We?” profile series and exhibit. The competition asked Washington students in grades 6-12 to share who they are and who they hope to become. Contestants could submit entries in different formats, including writings,…

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From Legacy Washington: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Seattle visit

From Legacy Washington: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Seattle visit

Martin Luther King Jr. delivers a speech during his only visit to Seattle. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Archives) With the nation observing Martin Luther King Jr. Day, it’s worth recalling the time when the civil rights icon paid his lone visit to Seattle, in 1961. The Rev. Dr. Samuel B. McKinney, the Seattle civil rights activist, arranged for King to come to the Emerald City. Legacy Washington’s online profile on Dr. McKinney, released last January, describes what happened when…

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