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Dollivers visit building named after their father

Dollivers visit building named after their father

It isn’t every day that a building is named after one of your parents. In the case of Peter and Beth Dolliver, the James M. Dolliver Building in Olympia is named after their father, who was an advisor and chief of staff for Gov. Dan Evans for 12 years and later a State Supreme Court Justice for nearly a quarter century, including two years as Chief Justice. James Dolliver died in 2004 at age 80. The building, located at 801…

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Descendants of `last signer’ view state constitution

Descendants of `last signer’ view state constitution

Like they say, it’s better late than never. Even if it’s 42 years late. James A. Hungate would have agreed. A Democrat and farmer from Pullman, Hungate was a delegate to the 1889 Constitutional Convention in Olympia. But Hungate had to leave for home before the new state constitution was ready for him to sign. “The constitution was almost ready for signature,” Hungate recalled in a 1931 interview with the Spokesman-Review, “when I received a letter from Mrs. Hungate telling…

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Batman star Adam West’s connection to Washington State Archives

Batman star Adam West’s connection to Washington State Archives

Like many “Batman” fans, we were saddened to hear of last week’s passing of Adam West. West, who played Batman on the 1960s TV series, died in Los Angeles on June 9 following a brief battle with leukemia. He was 88. What we didn’t know is that our State Archives has a connection to the actor who played the Caped Crusader in the popular yet short-lived series.   Holy Archives, Batman! West had deep roots in Washington! On September 19, 1928,…

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From Digital Archives: photos of 1889 Seattle Fire

From Digital Archives: photos of 1889 Seattle Fire

When you ask the historical significance of June 6, most people think of the anniversary of D-Day. But June 6 also marks a horrific event in Seattle history. On that date in 1889, a fire destroyed much of Seattle, which was then a timber town and many years from becoming a world-famous city. Our Legacy Washington program’s exhibit on the year when Washington reached statehood, “Washington 1889: Blazes, Rails and Year of Statehood,” includes a section on the 1889 Great…

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From the Archives: Postcard of 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition

From the Archives: Postcard of 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition

If you were around for this opening, you have lived a very long time! On June 1, 1909, about 80,000 people attended the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition opening in Seattle where the University of Washington campus stands today. More than 3 million people attended the 1909 expo, which closed that year in mid-October. The Washington State Archives has this classic color postcard (above) offering a bird’s eye view of the exposition grounds, with Mount Rainier in the distance to the south. This…

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From the Digital Archives: 1909 Washington highway map

From the Digital Archives: 1909 Washington highway map

Nowadays, when we look at a highway map of Washington, we see a complex web of gold, red and black lines crisscrossing the state. But it wasn’t always this way. In the early 1900s, highways were a rarity in the Evergreen State. Probably because cars and trucks were rarities as well, considering that the automobile had just been invented. This 1909 map displays Washington’s located and proposed highways, railroads (the dominant form of transportation then) and county seats. The map…

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Archives honors Washington History Day winners

Archives honors Washington History Day winners

Five Washington students recently showed they might have the stuff to be the next Ken Burns. The Washington State Historical Society coordinates Washington History Day, which features an annual contest for students in grades 6-12 throughout the state. The Washington State Archives supports History Day by having staff volunteer to serve as contest judges. The contest encourages students to become historians by developing research, analysis, presentation and social skills. Working individually or in groups, students select a topic related to…

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Digital Archives staffer contributes to award-winning book

Digital Archives staffer contributes to award-winning book

As the electronics records archivist for the Washington State Digital Archives, Debbie Bahn plays a key role at the first digital archives in the U.S. Bahn now can claim she also is part of a team of contributors that earned a national archives award. The Society of American Archivists recently announced that Philip C. Bantin, director of the archives and records management specialization at Indiana University, is the 2017 recipient of its Waldo Gifford Leland Award for his book, Building…

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From the Archives: Mount St. Helens photos

From the Archives: Mount St. Helens photos

If you mention “May 18, 1980” to an older Washingtonian, you’ll likely get a knowing response: It’s the day Mount St. Helens erupted. It was on a sunny morning 37 years ago today that the eruption blew off the top 1,300 feet from its once cone-like summit, killing 57 people and thousands of animals, and destroying or flattening thousands of acres of timber. The eruption occurred when the mountain’s north face collapsed due to an earthquake, resulting in the largest…

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From the Archives: Classic fishing photos!

From the Archives: Classic fishing photos!

We know we don’t have to tell Washington’s fishing community, but Saturday marks the opening weekend of trout fishing in many lowland lakes. To help celebrate the big opening, and to help get folks in the mood to grab their poles and tackle boxes, we’re sharing a few of the classic fishing photos found in the State Digital Archives website. The top photo shows a man in waders fishing in an unidentified river with mountains in the background.  The photo…

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