WA Secretary of State Blogs

Special Edition! Washington Digital Newspapers website is ready for the oldest & newest news!

July 25th, 2016 Nono Burling Posted in Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public No Comments »

From the desk of Shawn Schollmeyer

WDNWASportsThe latest “news” on the newspaper collections is the merging of two existing collections into a new one called “Washington Digital Newspapers,” (WDN) which will give the public easier, full-text search access to these historic newspapers (move over, Google!). You can now browse titles, view by calendar date or pick a location from a map to search the issues here. The collection currently includes more than 45 titles and over 306,000 newspaper pages. Now it’s also mobile friendly so you can research with your smart phone or tablet device!

The website will also feature some more recent issues of the Eatonville Dispatch (1916-2010), our current digitization project due to be included this fall. Most of the newspapers will be pre-1923, which are considered “public domain” available for students and teachers to download for school research projects without worrying about requesting copyright permissions for use. We’ll be rolling in our earliest pioneer & territorial titles from the Historic Online Newspapers collection, which is currently indexed by subject and proper names, so it too will be full-text searchable over the next couple years.

WDN_WACrimeA recent addition to the collection is the Tacoma Evening Telegraph (1886-1887). More additions by the end of this year include the Centralia Daily Hub (1914-1916), Spokane’s Danske Kronike (Danish/English, 1916-1917), and Dat Moi (Vietnamese/English, 1974-1987). Washington State Library staff will add at least 40,000 pages of new content by end of this year, content that hasn’t appeared in any of the library’s earlier digital collections or on Chronicling America. Just this month the Anacortes Museum signed on to help us digitize the Anacortes American in 2017!

The Washington State Library is a rich resource of information for students, genealogists, researchers and history enthusiasts as one of the best `go-to’ places to find Washington newspapers. We have the largest selection of Washington newspapers on microfilm and we’re excited to be a new associate member of the Washington Newspaper Publishers’ Association. This fall we will be meeting with newspaper publishers and editors to help ensure that our history and culture will be best preserved in  newspapers from print, microfilm and into the born-digital world of current news media!

 

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WSL Updates for July 21, 2016

July 21st, 2016 Shirley Lewis Posted in For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

Volume 12, July 21, 2016 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) WASHINGTON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEE TRAINING WORKSHOPS

2) ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR MICROSOFT IMAGINE ACADEMY 2016-2017 GRANTS

3) DISASTER RESPONSE & RECOVERY: PUBLIC LIBRARIES AS KEY COMMUNITY PARTNERS

4) WLMA 2016 CONFERENCE REGISTRATION IS OPEN

5) MRSC OFFERS FREE WEBINAR SERIES

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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WSL UPDATES SPECIAL EDITION FOR FRIDAY, JULY 15, 2016

July 15th, 2016 Shirley Lewis Posted in For Libraries, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

WSL UPDATES SPECIAL EDITION FOR FRIDAY, JULY 15, 2016

Note: The next regular edition of WSL Updates will appear on Thursday, July 21, 2016.

WASHINGTON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEE TRAINING WORKSHOPS

All Washington public library trustees and library directors are invited to trustee training workshops sponsored by the Washington State Library. These workshops will delve into the roles of trustees and the board’s relationship with the library director. Attendees will be more informed and confident about their working relationships, communicating with each other and their library director.

Ruth Metz of Ruth Metz Associates will be the workshop trainer. Ruth has extensive experience working with libraries on leadership and organizational development.

Public library advisory board members are welcome, but the program is geared for governing boards.

Dates and places:

  • Tuesday, August 16 – Ramada at Spokane Airport, Spokane
  • Thursday, August 18 – Hampton Inn, Richland
  • Tuesday, September 20 – location to be determined, Everett
  • Thursday, September 22 – location to be determined, Kelso

For the August workshops, registration deadline is Wednesday, August 3, 2016.

For the September workshops, registration deadline is Wednesday, September 7, 2016.

Space is limited, so please register as soon as possible.

To register, visit the WSL Training Calendar at sos.wa.gov/q/training.

You may register for sessions A, B, C, or D or any combination. Please note, to sign up for Session B – Lunch, you must attend either the morning or afternoon session or both.

The workshop schedule:

8:00 – 9:00 a.m. – Gathering, morning coffee – Refreshments for gathering and breaks provided by Washington State Library.

A. Morning session – 9:00 – 12:00 p.m. (three hours including break)

  • Welcome and a brief overview of public library service in Washington – 9:00 – 9:30 a.m.
  • Roles of trustees & working together as a board – 9:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. with a break

B. Lunch & Networking – 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch provided by the Washington State Library. Please note, to sign up for lunch, you must attend either the morning or afternoon session or both.

C. Afternoon session – 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. with a break

  • How to evaluate director
  • Board self-evaluation

Dinner is on your own.

D. Evening session – 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Repeat of these topics

  • Working together as a board/ Board self-evaluation
  • Working with the director/Evaluating the director

Questions about these workshops? Please email Shirley Lewis at shirley.lewis@sos.gov.wa.

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To register, visit the WSL Training Calendar at sos.wa.gov/q/training.

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The Washington State Library has gone social! Friend/follow us at:

Facebook: on.fb.me/FBWSL;

Twitter: twitter.com/WAStateLib.

 

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Washington State Library Digital Collections – Historical Maps

July 14th, 2016 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public No Comments »

From the desk of Jeff Martin

The State Archives and the State Library hold extensive map collections dealing with the Washington State and the surrounding region. This new blog post shows two more examples. The first map shows military stations occupied and abandoned as of January 1881; railroads existing and projected; wagon roads, and lighthouses. The map has been reduced in size for presentation.

map 1

Author
Symons, T. W. (Thomas William), 1849-1920.
Title Map of the Department of the Columbia / projected and compiled at the Engineer Office, Department of the Columbia, by Lieut. Thomas W. Symons, Corps of Engineers ; assisted by Alfred Downing and C.C. Manning, topographical assistants, U.S. Army ; drawn by Alfred Downing, topographical assistant.
Imprint
[Washington, D.C. : Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army], 1881.
Note Electronic data.Relief shown by hachures. Includes list of sources consulted in compilation.  Shows military stations occupied and abandoned as of January 1881; railroads existing and projected; wagon roads, and lighthouses.
“Brevet Brig. Gen. Frank Wheaton, commanding Department.”
“Prepared and published under the direction of Brig. Gen. H.G. Wright, Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army.”

The next map shows an emigrant wagon road to California in addition to selected features of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

map2

 

 

Author Mitchell, S. Augustus (Samuel Augustus), 1792-1868.
Title Map of Oregon, Washington, and part of Idaho 
Imprint [Philadelphia] : S. Augustus Mitchell, [1863], c1860.
Description 1 map.
Note Relief shown by hachures.
“Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1860 by S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr. in the Clerks Office of the District Court of the U.S. for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.”
Prime meridians: Washington and Greenwich.
In right margin: 44.
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WSL Updates for July 14, 2016

July 14th, 2016 Shirley Lewis Posted in For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

Volume 12, July 14, 2016 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR MICROSOFT IMAGINE ACADEMY 2016-2017 GRANTS

2) PUBLIC LIBRARY POLICIES WEBPAGE UPDATED

3) SUPERCHARGED STORYTIMES – FREE RESOURCES

4) SUSAN HILDRETH TO JOIN ISCHOOL FACULTY

5) MRSC OFFERS FREE WEBINAR SERIES

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Historic Fire Lookouts in Washington

July 11th, 2016 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public No Comments »

Historic Fire Lookout Stations - StorymapAs we enter, what will no doubt be, another intense fire season in Washington State, it is comforting to know that technology and modern methods are in place to spot and stop wildfires quickly.  But it also brings to mind a reflection on how fires were managed in the early 20th century.  One answer was a chain of fire lookout stations, many built by the CCC in the 1930’s.  “Back in the 1930s the still-growing lookout system seemed like a stable part of the fire protection program of the forests of Washington. “ (Spring and Fish, pg. 11).  “They were placed, wherever possible, so at least two stations could overlap surveillance of the same territory and thus accurately pinpoint the location of a fire.” (pg. 14).  In 1953 the U.S. claimed 5,060 “permanent” fire lookouts (pg. 22) with 685 in Washington.

As keepers of our state’s history the Washington State Library has a variety of resources that help us remember this piece of our past.  One such resource is the wonderful Washington Rural Heritage collection.  This is an ever growing collection of images pulled from personal collections and small historic museums.  Part of the collection includes pictures of fire lookout towers from around the state as well as panoramic images taken from lookout towers.  Pulling images from the Rural Heritage collection and our digital photo collection we decided to create an interactive storymap to keep the history alive.

In addition to the historic images we have several books in our collections about fire lookouts.  So if you are interested in the history, the legends or the modern practicality of how to visit or even cook at a lookout station remember that much of our collection can be requested through ILL.

Doty, Thomas. Trek to Table Mountain: Seasons of Stories. Ashland, OR: Upriver Downriver Productions, 2003. Print.

Kresek, Ray. Fire Lookouts of the Northwest. Fairfield, Wash: Ye Galleon Press, 1998. Print.

Langston, Libby. Lookout Cookbook: A Collection of Recipes by Forest Fire Lookouts Throughout the United States. Coeur d’Alene, Idaho: Museum of North Idaho, 2005. Print.

McFadden, Tish, and Tom Foley. How to Rent a Fire Lookout in the Pacific Northwest: A Guide to Renting Fire Lookouts, Guard Stations, Ranger Cabins, Warming Shelters and Bunkhouses in the National Forests of Oregon and Washington. Berkeley, CA: Wilderness Press, 2005. Internet resource.

Rideout, Ham. Fire Watch: A Summer to Be Remembered at the Steliko Point and Badger Mountain Lookouts : Memoirs of a Jr. Forest Guard and so Much More! Steilacoom Wash.: N.p., 2006. Print.

Luckily for Washington many lookout stations still exist. Today there are eighty-seven lookouts which remain standing. (Abegg) So, if you’re up for a hike or perhaps the chance to spend a night in a piece of history why not venture out and visit one yourself.

References
Abegg, Steff. “Fire Lookout Structures.” www.sTePhaBeGg.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016.

Spring, Ira, and Byron Fish. Lookouts: Firewatchers of the Cascades and Olympics. Seattle: The Mountaineers, 1981. Print.

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WSL Updates for July 7, 2016

July 7th, 2016 Shirley Lewis Posted in For Libraries, News, Updates No Comments »

Volume 12, July 7, 2016 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) MINECRAFT® PROGRAM FOR KIDS WEBINAR

2) WSL EMAIL LISTS – FREE, FAST, FUN

3) WALE 2016 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE

4) THE UNCONFERENCE RETURNS

5) PNLA REGISTRATION OPEN

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Classics in Washington History- Bigelow Family mementos

July 5th, 2016 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public No Comments »

From the Desk of Jeff Martin 2016-06-29_11-41-40

The Bigelow Family mementos are a marvelous collection of memorabilia of an early Thurston County family.   The collection consists of a hand written journal (and transcription), photos, newspaper clippings, and birth, death and marriage records.

Written by

Daniel R. Bigelow

Digitized version of the unpublished diary

[Daniel R. Bigelow diary, 1848-1853] (118, [7] p.) — [Transcription of] the Daniel R. Bigelow diary, 1848-1853 / transcribed by Roger Easton — Reminiscences of the last survivor of the First Territorial Legislature of Washington / Alice Palmer Henderson (The State, [1899?], p. 295-299) — Through many perils : Mrs. [William] White’s journey across the continent to meet her husband … / (account by Margaret Margaret McCallen Stewart White Ruddell, mother of Anne Elizabeth White Bigelow) (Weekly ledger (Tacoma, Wash.), [189-?], p. 12+)

Collection appears courtesy of George Bigelow (grandson of Daniel R. Bigelow); Some pages in this collection are not searchable because they are handwritten.

Daniel Richardson Bigelow was born March 21, 1824 in Belleville, New York. He joined a wagon-train and headed west on the Oregon Trail to Portland, then sailed up the coast in the schooner Exact to Puget Sound in Nov. 1851. He established a law office in Smithfield (now called Olympia). On June 18, 1854, he married Ann Elizabeth White, the first school teacher in the area. Ann was born Nov. 3, 1836 in Illinois and arrived in Olympia with her family in late 1851. Daniel was Treasurer of Thurston County, a member of the first legislature of Washington Territory, Superintendent of the Olympia School, and President of the Board of Trustees of Puget Sound Wesleyan Institute (forerunner of the University of Puget Sound). He was one of three commissioners who completely rewrote the laws of Oregon Territory at Salem during the summer of 1853. Their recommendations were accepted by the Legislative Assembly and enacted into law, creating the new Territory of Washington. Daniel Bigelow died Sept. 15, 1905 at Olympia. Ann Elizabeth Bigelow died Feb. 8, 1926. The Bigelows had 9 children.

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Olympics of the Mind and Body – July 2016

July 1st, 2016 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public No Comments »

From the desk of Shirley Lewis olympics of the mind and body

July 1

Explore historic forts: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site and Fort Nisqually Living History Museum are two examples which were established by the Hudson’s Bay Company in what later became Washington Territory.

July 4 – Observe our nation’s independence by marveling at the scope of U.S. Government publications. Washington State Library is a regional Federal Depository Library for Washington and Alaska. We’ve got the day off to celebrate, but if you have questions about federal government publications, please Ask a Librarian at the Washington State Library.

July 5

Take a hike — or a walk — Washington has trails for all modes of perambulation. How about the John Wayne Pioneer Trail in Iron Horse State Park? This trail traverses the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, a not-for-profit organization that works to conserve land from Seattle across the Cascade Mountains to Central Washington.

July 6

Charles Dudley Warner wrote “politics makes strange bedfellows“(Summer in a Garden, Fifteenth Week, end of second paragraph). Here’s a few of biographies and oral histories of notable Washingtonians involved in government, politics, and journalism. Strange bedfellows?

You decide:

July 7

Got dairy? Visit the Washington Dairy Products Commission to learn about Washington’s dairy industry. Check out the Facebook page, too. The cheese doesn’t stand alone in Toledo (Lewis County); it has a parade! Meanwhile, at Washington State University’s Creamery in Pullman, they can Cougar Gold® cheese so you can eat what they can.

July 8

Enjoy the purple haze and fragrance of fields of lavender: Sequim Lavender Festival, Blue Mountain Lavender Farm in the Walla Walla Valley and Pelindabra Lavender (San Juan Island).

July 11

Explore North Cascades National Park – you’ll find beautiful scenery, a landscape of fascinating ecosystems, and hikes which challenge the body and mind. If you can’t make it there, enjoy a new exhibit at the Burke Museum in Seattle: Wild Nearby – Discover Washington’s North Cascades or try reading North Cascades Traveler’s Guide or The North Cascades: Finding Beauty and Renewal in the Wild Nearby from your deck chair.

July 12

Discover the Washington Talking Book & Braille Library (WTBBL), a program of the Washington State Library. Located in Seattle, WTBBL provides library services state-wide, at the library and by mail, to any Washington resident unable to read standard print material due to blindness, visual impairment, deaf-blindness, physical disability (cannot hold a book or turn pages), or reading disability.

July 13

Get your kicks with soccer: root for the Seattle Sounders FC, read about the Seattle Sounders famous rivalry with the Portland Timbers or celebrate 50 years of soccer with Washington Youth Soccer.

July 14

Aviation is a super (sonic) part of Washington’s history. Fly high with a Boeing test pilot’s memoir, restore vintage airplanes in the youth program at the Port Townsend Aero Museum, read about and visit Pearson Field in Vancouver, or soar into the Museum of Flight. Learn about flights that didn’t go so well in Aircraft Wrecks of the Pacific Northwest, Volume 1 and Volume 2.

July 15

The Washington Blueberry Commission serves the blueberry growers of Washington who serve us delicious, nutritious blueberries. Find a farm and enjoy those fresh berries.

July 18

Get teed off – go golfing! There are golfers and public courses throughout Washington. The City of Spokane has four municipal golf courses. Chambers Bay, owned and operated by Pierce County, hosted the U.S. Open in 2015; read all about the course in America’s St. Andrews: Linking Golf from its Past to its Future.

July 19

Enjoy the people, places, and rolling landscape on the Palouse Scenic Byway.

July 20

Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage is a great hike to view the geologic forces which shaped Washington.

July 21

Visit the New Dungeness Lighthouse near Sequim on the Olympic Peninsula – hike or boat to the lighthouse; climb the stairs to see the view; learn how you can be a keeper. Operating since 1857, the lighthouse has a long history. Washington State Library has a copy of List of Visitors to the New Dungeness Lighthouse from 1895 to 1920.

July 22

Ride a bike – the Washington State Department of Transportation works to provide a safe ride for bicyclists. It’s paying off because Washington has been named the nation’s number one “Bicycle Friendly State” by the League of American Bicyclists for several years.

July 25

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Washington Native Plant Society. Washington State Library subscribes to the Society’s journal, Douglasia.

July 26

Come listen to the music in the great outdoors: the Winthrop Rhythm & Blues Festival; the Olympic Music Festival; the Gorge Amphitheatre; and at the Artisans at the Dahmen Barn (near Uniontown in Whitman County) are just a few concerts available.

July 27

Delve into the past and present with Washington newspapers at the Washington State Library. The newspaper collection includes current issues on paper and historic newspapers on microfilm with some searchable online. WSL subscribes to about 125 daily and weekly newspapers throughout Washington.  The microfilm collection consists of over 40,000 reels of newspapers dating from the 1850s to the present. Search Washington State Library’s online catalog for newspapers by City, County, Title, Subject, or Keywords.

July 28

Climbing every mountain? You’ve got plenty to pick from here and some good company, too. Read Jim Whittaker’s A Life on the Edge: Memoirs of Everest and Beyond, or Fred Beckey’s climbing guides to Washington mountains or Mike Gauthier’s Mount Rainier: a Climbing Guide.

July 29

Get on board a Washington state ferry: cruise on Puget Sound or cross the Columbia River. You can also cross the Columbia from Washington to Oregon on a Wahkiakum County ferry. You might need something to read while you wait in line (it does happen), so try Safe Passage: the Birth of Washington State Ferries: a HistoryLink Book.

 

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WSL Updates for June 30, 2016

June 30th, 2016 Shirley Lewis Posted in For Libraries, News, Updates No Comments »

Volume 12, June 30, 2016 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) FREE BOOKS FOR WASHINGTON LIBRARIES

2) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

Read the rest of this entry »

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