WA Secretary of State Blogs

WSL Updates for March 23, 2017

March 22nd, 2017 Will Stuivenga Posted in For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

Volume 13, March 23, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) REFRESHING SCHOOL LIBRARIES GRANTS

2) RAISING VISIBILITY AND RELEVANCY

3) PUBLIC LIBRARY POLICIES UPDATE

4) THINK, DO, SHOW – EVALUATION WORKSHOP

5) IMLS RELEASES STATEMENT ON BUDGET

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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WSL Updates for March 16, 2017

March 16th, 2017 Will Stuivenga Posted in Digital Collections, For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

Volume 13, March 16, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) WASHINGTON RURAL HERITAGE GRANTS

2) USER EXPERIENCE JUMPSTART

3) METADATA CLEANUP GRANTS

4) ONECLICK 2017 RENEWAL

5) LIBRARY 2.017 VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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WSL Updates for March 9, 2017

March 8th, 2017 Will Stuivenga Posted in For Libraries, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates Comments Off on WSL Updates for March 9, 2017

Volume 13, March 9, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) SERVICE EXCELLENCE IN YOUR LIBRARY

2) JOIN NASA IN CELEBRATING EARTH DAY

3) SUMMER MEALS PROGRAM

4) TRENDS ANALYSIS

5) CONFRONTING MISINFORMATION

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Access to Historic Congressional Information

March 7th, 2017 Rand Simmons Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public Comments Off on Access to Historic Congressional Information

Photo of a puzzled emoticon (smiley face)

Courtesy Wikimedia commons

Remember these?

  • The Administrations of Presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Jimmy Carter
  • Passage/ratification of the 26th Amendment (allowing 18-year-olds to vote)
  • Watergate
  • The end of the Vietnam War
  • The US Bicentennial
  • Civil Service Reform Act of 1978
  • The Iran Hostage Crisis
  • OPEC and the Oil Crises of the 1970s
  • Title IX Amendment of the Higher Education Act

The 1970’s. Ugh! High gas prices, low mpg, and 55 mph speed limits! So what was going in Congress?

The U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) just announced that in partnership with the Library of Congress the have released the digital version of the bound Congressional Record from 1971-1980. You can search it on GPO’s govinfo. This release covers debates and proceedings of the 92nd through the 96th Congresses.

Photo of US GPO eagle logo

Courtesy Government Printing Off

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873, and is still published today. Click here to learn more.

Library of Congress logo

Courtesy of the Library of   Congress

Issues dating from 1995 (beginning with the 104th Congress) are available online. Many federal depository libraries (like us) will have issues available in print. Current issues become available on Congress.gov shortly after they are published on GPO’s FDsys.

Need more information or assistance in finding congressional information? We love to help! You can reach us by clicking here.

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Classics in Washington History: Remembering Japanese Internment

March 2nd, 2017 mschaff Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public Comments Off on Classics in Washington History: Remembering Japanese Internment

From the desk of Kathryn Devine, from materials compiled in part by Judy Pitchford.

Have you seen the library’s Classics in Washington History page? It’s an online collection of full-text books on Washington History.

Topics include county and regional history, military history, women’s stories, and other special collections that “bring together rare, out of print titles for easy access by students, teachers, genealogists, and historians.”

In remembrance of the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066 on February 19, we’d like to highlight several documents from the Washington State Library’s federal collection on the Japanese internment camps.

Some are contemporary studies of life in the camps, and others contain testimony from survivors about the experience.

Contemporary Reports and Analysis

Community analysis notes

War Relocation Authority, Documents Section, Office of Reports

[Washington, D.C.] : War Relocation Authority, c1944-1945

These reports were compiled by staff of the War Relocation Authority, a civilian agency responsible for the relocation of evacuees. It includes many interviews with internees and their attitudes toward the U. S. because of the internment.

www.sos.wa.gov/library/publications_detail.aspx?p=134

Community analysis report

War Relocation Authority, Documents Section, Office of Reports

[Washington, D.C.] : War Relocation Authority, c1942-1946

These reports deal with issues of unrest in the camps, religion and labor unrest. It also explore attitudes in the surrounding communities on the possible return of the Japanese.

www.sos.wa.gov/library/publications_detail.aspx?p=133

 Project analysis series

War Relocation Authority, Documents Section, Office of Reports

[Washington, D.C.] : War Relocation Authority, c-1946

These reports cover the Tule Lake incident, questions of repatriation and community government.

www.sos.wa.gov/library/publications_detail.aspx?p=135

Trends in the relocation centers. III

War Relocation Authority, Community Analysis Section

[Washington, D.C.] : The Section, [1945]

This document addresses the concerns of evacuees about the closing of the relocation centers and how their needs were to be met re-entering society.

www.sos.wa.gov/library/publications_detail.aspx?p=282

 

Later Reports from Congressional Hearings

Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians act : hearing before the Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, on S. 1647, March 18, 1980

United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Governmental Affairs

Washington : U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1980

Testimony before a commission investigating the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII.

www.sos.wa.gov/library/publications_detail.aspx?p=264

Personal justice denied : report of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians : report for the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs 

United States. Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians

Washington : U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., 1992

A congressional committee report based on personal testimony and written documentation from witnesses who lived through the Japanese internment.

www.sos.wa.gov/library/publications_detail.aspx?p=263

Oral History from the Legacy Project

Robert Graham: Not-So-Simple Twists of Fate

An oral history from the Legacy Project, Office of the Secretary of State.

www.sos.wa.gov/legacyproject/oralhistories/RobertGraham/default.aspx

Mr. Graham relates his own experiences in World War II, including the fate of one of his Japanese-American friends, Perry Saito.

Looking for more information on the history of Executive Order 9066, Japanese internment, or any other aspect of Pacific Northwest history? Contact us through our Ask A Librarian service or make a research appointment to visit the Library.

 

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WSL Updates for March 2, 2017

March 1st, 2017 Will Stuivenga Posted in For Libraries, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates Comments Off on WSL Updates for March 2, 2017

Volume 13, March 2, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) RECRUITING A LIBRARY CONSULTANT

2) FIRST TUESDAYS – CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

3) PRIVACY LITERACY AT YOUR LIBRARY

4) NCCE ADOBE STORYTELLING ACADEMY

5) STATE OF DIGITIZATION REPORT

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Where in the State is Cindy Aden?

February 24th, 2017 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public Comments Off on Where in the State is Cindy Aden?

Since taking the helm of the State Library on August 1, 2016 our new librarian Cindy Aden has been on the go!   While Cindy is a past president of WLA and has worked in Washington for many years, it’s been a while since she visited some of the more remote corners of the state.

Cindy set herself the ambitious goal of meeting every one of her employees before the year was out.  While most of the State Library staff is in the Olympia area, the institutional libraries are scattered all over the state, from Walla Walla to Clallam Bay and many spots between. Using this as a springboard, her travels began.  We thought it would be fun to document her journey around the state to give all of us a bit of a ringside seat and peek into the large and small, the public, academic, special and school libraries that provide service to all of Washington.  This Storymap captures the first few months, but we will continue to add tour points.  What interesting thing will Cindy learn when she visits your library?

Cue the Carmen Sandiego song…

Click the picture to go to the full, interactive map.

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WSL Updates for February 23, 2017

February 22nd, 2017 Will Stuivenga Posted in For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Technology and Resources, Training and Continuing Education, Updates Comments Off on WSL Updates for February 23, 2017

Volume 13, February 23, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

2) FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE HISTORY 101

3) BEYOND THE WALLS – TV WHITESPACE FUNDING

4) THE CHANGING ROLE OF LIBRARIES

5) ALA LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Centralia Daily Hub

February 21st, 2017 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public Comments Off on Centralia Daily Hub

From the desk of Nikki Chiampa

The Centralia Daily Hub began as an Independent newspaper on September 29, 1913 with editor George A. Dew and publisher Madison “Elsy” Ellsworth Cue at the helm. The other publisher of the paper was the Hub Printing Company, Inc., an enterprise of which Cue was president. The Daily Hub was issued every afternoon with the exception of Sundays, reporting on both international and local news. Within a year of its inception, circulation of the paper had risen to approximately 1,141 issues, with distribution in Centralia and surrounding towns. During this time, Dew left his post at the paper and was succeeded by Victor Jackson. When Jackson left the paper in 1915, Cue ended up taking on the editorial role as well.

Significant events, including WW1, Women’s Suffrage, and Prohibition initially appeared as headlines on the front page. As time wore on, however, the newspaper shifted its focus to cover more socially inclined news on a local scale. The Daily Hub often took on a moral stance and eschewed objective reporting in its articles. When referring to the “drys,” those fighting for Prohibition, the paper describes the group as the “better element of this city.” In contrast, it berates the “clique” of local bankers and businessmen, declaring that these men defrauded the city during Centralia’s financial crisis of 1914. The Daily Hub remained righteous even when the topic was not political, expressing outrage at provocative movie posters on display at a local theater. The paper claims that “those whose mission it is to uplift, protest, and help to a better living” were being careless and slothful with their duties.

By its third year of publication, The Daily Hub was boasting of its “clear conscience” and the enemies it has gained, labeling their opponents as the “lawless and predatory” populace of Centralia. However, staff of The Daily Hub were not immune to the consequences of their antagonism. In one case, Vera Reynolds, a staff writer, was arraigned in court for libel. She alleged in one of her articles that prosecuting attorney Chester Alan Studebaker and Sheriff Thomas C. Foster were “laid out” by Frank Nehring, whom they were attempting to arrest. Even The Daily Hub’s publisher, M.E. Cue, was tried in court multiple times and charged in 1916 for throwing a pig of linotype metal at Joe Lucas, a local theater manager.

After only five years and with 2,228 papers in circulation, The Daily Hub officially ceased publication on March 30, 1918. It was succeeded by The Centralia Evening Hub, which ran for the month of April that same year. Immediately thereafter, it transformed into the Republican paper, The Centralia Daily Hub, which was issued from May 1, 1918 until publication was suspended on April 10, 1919. During these rapid changes, M.E. Cue and his company remained as publishers up to the final issue of the paper’s demise. Although the Centralia Daily Hub announced plans to return from its “sabbatical,” it had no successors.

The Centralia Daily Hub along with many other early Washington newspapers can be found on our Washington Digital Newspapers website.

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WSL Updates for February 16, 2017

February 15th, 2017 Will Stuivenga Posted in For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Public Services, Training and Continuing Education, Updates Comments Off on WSL Updates for February 16, 2017

Volume 13, February 16, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) SIGN UP FOR SERVICE EXCELLENCE

2) VISUALIZING (AND FINDING!) LIBRARY FUNDING

3) NIH FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

4) NEW IMLS GRANT OPPORTUNITY

5) WE’RE WAY PAST PEAS – USES OF GENETIC INFORMATION

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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