WA Secretary of State Blogs

WSL Updates for February 16, 2017

February 15th, 2017 Will Stuivenga Posted in For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Public Services, Training and Continuing Education, Updates Comments Off on WSL Updates for February 16, 2017

Volume 13, February 16, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) SIGN UP FOR SERVICE EXCELLENCE

2) VISUALIZING (AND FINDING!) LIBRARY FUNDING

3) NIH FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

4) NEW IMLS GRANT OPPORTUNITY

5) WE’RE WAY PAST PEAS – USES OF GENETIC INFORMATION

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

Read the rest of this entry »

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Russian Interference with 2016 Elections

January 12th, 2017 Rand Simmons Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For the Public, Public Services Comments Off on Russian Interference with 2016 Elections

2016 Presidential ElectionIn the year 2017 “Fake News” is on everyone’s lips and lately the news has been dominated by speculation that Russia intervened in the US election.  As librarians we know to look for a reputable source and to verify information. Federal publications help keep the public informed. The Washington State Library is a federal depository library (Federal Depository Library Program, Government Publishing Office) and serves as the Regional Depository Library for the states of Washington and Alaska.

The latest from National Public Radio: “CIA Concludes Russian Interference Aimed To Elect Trump. The CIA has concluded that Russia intervened in the 2016 election specifically to help Donald Trump win the presidency, a U.S. official has confirmed to NPR. … Now they [the CIA] have come to the conclusion that Russia was trying to tip the election to Trump.” (Kelly, Mary Louise. “CIA Concludes Russian Interference Aimed to Elect Trump.” NPR – the two-way, 10 Dec. 2016, http://n.pr/2j20Ygk. Accessed 10 Jan. 2017.)  

The media — television, radio, newspapers and social media — have been rife with stories like these. As the calendar rolls toward the Inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States on January 20th the focus on Russian interference with the 2016 Presidential Election remains hot.

President Obama directed the CIA, the FBI and the National Security Agency to prepare a report on their findings regarding Russian cyber attacks during the 2016 election cycle. A highly redacted version was made public on January 6, 2017. If you would like to read the report you will find it at https://www.dni.gov/files/documents/ICA_2017_01.pdf.

For information assistance contact our Ask A Librarian staff.

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WSL Remembers John Glenn and Library 21

December 9th, 2016 mschaff Posted in Articles, For the Public, Public Services Comments Off on WSL Remembers John Glenn and Library 21

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John Glenn and Washington State Librarian Maryan Reynolds at Century 21.

American hero John Glenn died yesterday after an action-packed 95 years. Glenn was a decorated fighter pilot who earned the Distinguished Flying Cross five times, the first American to orbit the Earth in the Friendship 7 capsule, a 24 year public servant as a Senator from Ohio, and the oldest person to ever fly in space when he flew aboard the shuttle Columbia in 1998. It would be hard to underestimate Glenn’s impact on American culture. His legacy was cemented for many during his first historic space flight in February 1962 – the same year as Seattle’s World Fair, Century 21.

Century 21 opened on February 21, 1962, a mere two months after Glenn’s achievement. As a celebration of science and technology, Century 21 was a natural outlet for celebration of this triumph.  John Glenn  visited the Fair on May 21, 1962 and that’s when a fascinating intersection with Washington State Library occurred.

At the urging of the Washington Library Association, the American Library Association had sponsored a Century 21 exhibit on the library of the future, which was called “Library 21.” Employees from the State Library staffed the exhibit through a deal with the U.S. Office of Education that was brokered by Senator Warren Magnuson. Former State Librarian Maryan Reynolds takes up the story in her book about the history of the State Library, “Dynamics of Change”:

In May 1962, the State Library hosted the Western State Library Conference in Olympia. Naturally, a visit to Library 21 was on the agenda. In the middle of the conference I was summoned to take a call from Senator Magnuson’s office; lo and behold, Magnuson had arranged for the celebrated astronaut John Glenn to visit the Library 21 exhibit and wanted me to be present. Library conference or not, there was no refusing this request. I was present as the famous man toured the exhibit. I recall remarking, near the end of Glenn’s visit, ‘I’m never going to participate in another mob scene like this!’ A newsman, overhearing me, gleefully commented, ‘Oh, yes you will!’

Most of the details about Library 21, as well as Glenn’s reaction to it, are currently lost to history. But several photos of Glenn touring the exhibit with Maryan Reynolds remain. The prints are stored in Manuscript 321, which contains the draft and source materials for “Dynamics of Change.” The one below appears in the book, but we’re partial to the top image that shows Glenn examining something (or perhaps signing an autograph) while a beaming Maryan looks on, decked out in a fine paisley suit (possibly space inspired), hat, and beaded necklace. If only the photo was in color – that outfit must have been amazing.

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John Glenn and Maryan Reynolds shake hands at Century 21.

The Washington State Archives has posted additional photos of Glenn’s visit to Century 21 on its Facebook page. Godspeed, John Glenn.

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Pearl Harbor at 75

December 7th, 2016 Rand Simmons Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services Comments Off on Pearl Harbor at 75

Pearl Harbor turns seventy-five

USS Arizona Pearl Harbor

Photo of the USS Arizona which fully sank and was never recovered after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Public Domain/Wikimedia Commons.

Only five men are still alive that experienced the Japanese attack on the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. All five are in their mid-nineties. One of them, 96-year-old Lauren Bruner, lives in Washington State.

Yesterday all but one gathered in Hawaii to celebrate Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.

Moments before 8 a.m. on December 7, 1941, the United States was ‘suddenly and deliberately attacked.’ Hundreds of Japanese fighter planes and bombers launched a surprise assault on American soil at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The volley on the U.S. naval base was swift and devastating: 2,403 Americans were killed, and another 1,178 were wounded; American battleships sunk; other ships were irreparably damaged; and almost 200 U.S. aircraft were destroyed.

President Roosevelt delivers his "Day of Infamy" speech to a joint session of Congress on December 8, 1941. (Image source: archives.gov)

The next day, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to formally declare war against Imperial Japan. It was then that Roosevelt spoke those famous words, proclaiming December 7, 1941 “a date which will live in infamy.” America had finally joined WWII. That momentous week of loss and defiance took place seventy-five years ago this month. (Text from Government Book Talk, Dec. 7, 2015)

Based on data collected by the Veterans Affairs the WWII Veterans Museum in New Orleans estimates that only 620,000 of the 16 million Americans — men and women — who fought in World War II remain alive. They are now in their late 80s and 90s. Many, like my father, who served in the Philippines, have died.

While it is true that the Japanese military planned and carried out the attack on Pearl Harbor many Japanese Americans fought for their country, the United States. A favorite of mine is a small federal publication, When the Akimotos Went to War: An Untold Story of Family, Patriotism, and Sacrifice During World War II. The citation is at the end of this article.

The Government Publishing Office makes available a variety of government publications that reference the historic Pearl Harbor attack. You will find many or these listed in the Washington State Library catalog dating from 1946.

Citations

Ching, Shawn. “Last Remaining USS Arizona Survivors Recall Pearl Harbor Attack – Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL.” Home – Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL, www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/33967105/last-remaining-uss-arizona-survivors-recall-pearl-harbor-attack.

Elms, Matthew. When the Akimotos Went to War: An Untold Story of Family, Patriotism, and Sacrifice During World War II. 2015. Available at WSL: Y 3.AM 3:2 AK 5 and online at http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo67846.

Hawkins, Trudy. “‘A Date Which Will Live in Infamy’: Remembering Pearl Harbor.” Government Book Talk | Talking About Some of the Best Publications from the Federal Government, Past and Present, 7 Dec. 2015, govbooktalk.gpo.gov/tag/pearl-harbor/. Accessed 7 Dec. 2016.

Milko, Chelsea. “Pearl Harbor at 75 & Three Pacific Battles That Shaped WWII.” Government Book Talk, 6 Dec. 2016, govbooktalk.gpo.gov/2016/12/06/pearl-harbor-at-75-three-pacific-battles-that-shaped-wwii/. Accessed 7 Dec. 2016.

Shute, Megan. “14 Rare Photos From The Attack On Pearl Harbor.” OnlyInYourState, www.onlyinyourstate.com/hawaii/pearl-harbor-hawaii/.

 

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2016 World AIDS Day

December 1st, 2016 Rand Simmons Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services Comments Off on 2016 World AIDS Day

Photo of 2016 World AIDS Day logoEach year December 1 is designated World AIDS Day. Beginning in 1988 World AIDS Day has raised awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection. AIDS.gov reports there are 36.7 million individuals worldwide living with HIV/AIDS. 1.8 million are children who were infected by their HIV mothers during pregnancy, child birth or breast feeding.  By far the majority of individuals who have HIV/AIDS live in low- to middle-income countries.

In addition to AIDS.gov, part of the Department of Health and Human Services, nine other units of federal government address HIV/AIDS. The
President’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) identifies six lead agencies charged to implement the strategy. Watch President Obama: Updated National HIV AIDS Strategy.

Federal funding for HIV/AIDS in FY 2016 was $27,465,300 based on a report by the Henry J. 2016 World AIDS Day posterKaiser Family Foundation.

Learn more about HIV/AIDS. You can find federal resources at https://www.aids.gov/federal-resources/. Or ask you Federal Depository Library staff, like us. We serve as the Regional
Federal Depository Library for the states of Washington and Alaska. We want to help you so please contact us.

Locate your nearest Federal Depository Library.

Find graphics and resources.

 

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Washington State Library honors Hispanic heritage / Biblioteca del Estado de Washington rinde homenaje a la herencia hispana

October 14th, 2016 Rand Simmons Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Institutional Library Services, Public Services, Washington Talking Book and Braille Library Comments Off on Washington State Library honors Hispanic heritage / Biblioteca del Estado de Washington rinde homenaje a la herencia hispana

cropped-ask-wa-mast-small

Información en español

Need assistance finding information? Why don’t you Ask WA?

“Ask WA,” you say.

Ask-WA is a cooperative of more than 60 libraries throughout Washington State, both public and academic, that provide online reference services through chat, email, and instant messaging (IM). This statewide network is tied to a global network that provides access to online reference service, 24/7.

So, when you enter the Ask-WA portal, no matter the day or time, you should readily find help.

If you are a Spanish speaker there is a Spanish portal for you.

Ask-WA es un servicio de chat en línea que lo pone en contacto con un bibliotecario, tanto a nivel local como mundial. En inglés, éste servicio es disponible 24/7 utilizando una red mundial de bibliotecarios profesionales. En español, el servicio no es 24/7, a pesar de una extensa red de bibliotecarios de habla hispana que ofrece asistencia durante la mayor parte del tiempo, especialmente durante la semana.

Para saber si un bibliotecario está disponible para chatear en vivo, por favor, llene el formulario de chat en español de Ask-WA.

Si un bibliotecario no está disponible, usted puede enviar su pregunta por correo electrónico, usted recibirá una respuesta dentro de 48 horas (probablemente mucho antes).

Fiestas Patrias 2016

Fiestas Patrias

Recently staff of the State Library’s Washington Talking Book & Braille Library (WTBBL) staffed a table at this year’s Fiestas Patrias  held at the Seattle Center. State Librarian Cindy Aden was on hand to greet people.

The festival celebrates the independence of  Latin American countries. Belizeans, Brazilians, Chileans, Costa Ricans, Salvadoreans, Guatemalans, Hondurans, Mexicans, and Nicaraguans from all over the Pacific Northwest to gather and enjoy great food, dance, and music.

Fiesta Patrias was a wonderful opportunity for people to become acquainted with the Washington Talking Book & Braille Library. We, in turn, learned more about the communities we want to serve — individuals needing reading and information in non-English languages.

State Librarian Cindy Aden stated, “We take the motto of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, “That All May Read,” seriously. We know that having reading material and information in multiple languages is crucial in our diverse society. I am proud of the efforts of  Washington Talking Book & Braille Library to reach out to the Hispanic community and to have published its first Spanish-language audio book. The State Library has also provides Spanish language support for our AskWA virtual reference service. We are always looking for more ways to make a difference, and we support and  encourage other Washington libraries to do the same”.

WTBBL services are available to all Washington State residents who are unable to read standard print due to one or more of the following conditions:

  • Legal blindness
  • Visual impairment
  • Physical disability causing an inability to turn pages or comfortably hold a book for extended periods of time
  • Deaf-blindness
  • Reading disability due to organic dysfunction

Read more about the Washington Talking Book & Braille Library.

Las bibliotecas de prisiones

Our branch libraries in nine state prisons provide library and information services to inmates many of whom are non-English speakers. In 2014 the Prison Policy Initiative reported that Hispanics made up 14% of the inmates in Washington State prisons and jails. The State Library provides Spanish language material for those for whom English is not their native language. Our branch libraries are “public libraries” for the incarcerated.

ElClubBocados

Publicaciones federales en español

Federal and state publications are published in Spanish and other languages although the majority are published in English. For example, many of the tax materials published by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) are published in Spanish and material for kids such as El Club de los Dos Bocados (Two Bite Plate) published by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service.

Sigue a Will y Anna a probar dos bocados de cada grupo alimenticio y de como se convierten en el Club de los Dos Bocados! Este libro muy colorido introduce los cinco grupos de alimentos de MiPlato a niños pequeños y los motiva a probar alimentos de cada grupo alimenticio. El libro que tiene actividades interactivas tales como narración optional, realce de texto, juegos y activades interactivas, cetificados y páginas para colorear ayudaran a los niños a aprender acerca de MiPlato y una alimentación sana al mismo tiempo que mejora sus abilidades de lectura.

You can borrow the book from the State Library or other federal depository libraries, read it on line, or download it.

Need assistance finding state or federal publications in Spanish? Contact our Ask a Librarian service. We can help you find resources such as these: America’s PrepareAthon! Materials in Spanish from FEMA.

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The Tale of the Washington State Bird, Volume 2: Emma Otis the Bird Chairman, and the Garden Ladies

August 19th, 2016 mschaff Posted in Articles, For the Public, Public Services Comments Off on The Tale of the Washington State Bird, Volume 2: Emma Otis the Bird Chairman, and the Garden Ladies

GoldFinch Read Volume 1 here

From 1943 until 1951, the matter of designating an official Washington state bird languished.  Legislators seemed reluctant to bring the matter to a vote and interested outside groups appear to have lost hope in forcing their lawmakers to act.  Finally in 1951, another wave of interest in making the willow goldfinch official broke ashore, courtesy of a group of determined women from the Washington State Federation of Garden Clubs.

Enter Emma Otis, whose obituary caught the attention of our staff last October.  After Emma’s death, her granddaughter, Nancy Pugh, kindly shared with us some of Emma’s handwritten notes about her efforts to make the willow goldfinch Washington’s official state bird. Following some general observations about the goldfinch, its behavior and birdy character (“Responsibility seems to rest lightly upon the shoulders of the goldfinch”), Emma provided some context for these remarks:

This is the original script I used at a meeting of Capital District of Garden Clubs, when I was Bird Chairman for the District (Pierce & Thurston Counties). Concluded by saying that I hoped someday that this bird would be officially adopted as the State bird. The President asked if I would like to make a motion to that effect, which I did. Went something like this, “I move that the Capital District of Garden Clubs of WA go on record as favoring the adoption of the Willow Goldfinch as the official bird of the State of Washington and that it be presented to the State Federation of Garden Clubs for approval and an attempt be made to present it at the forthcoming meeting of the Legislature.”

The historical record is rather quiet on just when and how this was accomplished.  It is probable that Emma’s speech took place prior to the beginning of the 1951 Legislative Session, which convened January 8, 1951.  We consulted our collection of Olympia Garden Club manuscript materials, and unfortunately evidence to support Emma’s story was missing from the Olympia club’s 1950/1951 meeting minutes – probably because she spoke at a district meeting and not an Olympia club meeting.  The minutes do indicate there was some sort of state bird billboard campaign (no specifics provided) and it’s quite likely that the Federation of Garden Clubs encouraged its members to write letters petitioning their legislators.  Schoolchildren may again have been involved; a March 1963 Seattle Times article indicates that their vote in 1951 determined the fate of the state bird.  Again, evidence is not forthcoming regarding this claim.

The only other clear documentation of the leadership provided by the Federation of Garden Clubs on the GardenGate1951-excerptmatter of the state bird was a blurb that appeared in the March 1951 Olympia Garden Club newsletter, The Garden Gate.  Blanche Andreus and Gwen Hofer are specifically mentioned for their hard work in getting the “Bird Bill” passed.  As one might now expect, additional research into the background of these ladies and the work they did on behalf of the willow goldfinch was also unfruitful.

However they accomplished it, the women of the Washington State Federation of Garden Clubs put enough pressure on the Legislature that lawmakers were finally ready to act once they convened in 1951.  Senate Bill 318 was introduced by Senator Carlton Sears of Thurston County on February 15, 1951.  The stage was now set to get the willow goldfinch on the books as the official state bird.

Stay tuned for Volume 3 to see just how the Legislature responded to their call to action.

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The Tale of the Washington State Bird, Volume 1: Meadowlarks, Goldfinches, and Mugwumps

August 9th, 2016 mschaff Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For the Public, Public Services Comments Off on The Tale of the Washington State Bird, Volume 1: Meadowlarks, Goldfinches, and Mugwumps

GoldFinch

Every school child knows that the willow goldfinch is the official State Bird of Washington.  But less well known is the fact that the willow goldfinch had a long and controversial road to approval – 23 years of bickering and grandstanding, all of which culminated in a dramatic and highly amusing floor debate in the state’s House of Representatives.

But first, let’s go back to 1928 when Washington’s school children were given the task of selecting a state bird.  According to this website, the children selected the western meadowlark, a lovely bird with a problem.  The meadowlark was already state bird of Nebraska, Wyoming, and Oregon (selected in 1927 also by a poll of Oregon school children and made official with their governor’s proclamation).  It would go on to become the state bird of Montana, Kansas, and North Dakota as well, making it the second most popular state bird in the United States.  Clearly, school children across the country were partial to the meadowlark, but Washington needed a bird that was more unique.

In 1931, the Washington Federation of Women’s Clubs took up the issue, polling their membership over which bird should have the honor.  The ladies returned a different result: the willow goldfinch.  But rather than deciding the question, popular opinion had it that Washington now had two unofficial state birds.

And no one seemed in a hurry to decide the matter.  A full 12 years passed before the Senate passed Senate Bill 134 making the willow goldfinch the official state bird and the rhododendron the official state flower. The February 9, 1943 Seattle Times then described a prophetic exchange between Senator Barney Jackson of Pierce County and Senator Paul G. Thomas of King County during the floor debate regarding the state bird:

Jackson: What is the difference between a goldfinch and a mugwump?

Thomas: A goldfinch is a bird, but a mugwump is something that just sits on a fence with his mug on one side and his wump on the other.

But despite the senators’ self-aware debate of the goldfinch, the House of Representatives never took action on SB 134, and the official authorization languished in committee no man’s land.  Washington was now going on 15 years with no official state bird.  Just how long could the Legislature ignore the unofficial dual bird situation?  Tune in for our next installment to find out.

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National Parks Service in Washington State (parks, reserves, historic sites, etc.)

August 8th, 2016 Rand Simmons Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services, State Library Collections Comments Off on National Parks Service in Washington State (parks, reserves, historic sites, etc.)

Photograph of Liberty Mountain, North Cascades National Park.

Liberty Mountain, North Cascades National Park. Photo by Jim Culp. Used by permission.

Selected Resources

National Park Service

2016 marks the centennial anniversary of the National Park Service. “That’s 100 years of protecting America’s natural, historical and cultural treasures from all over the United States. These more than 400 beautiful, historic and exquisite sites cover over 80 million acres consisting of approximately 18,000 miles of trails, more than 75,000 archaeological sites and at least 247 species of threatened or endangered plants and animals.” (Text from http://bit.ly/2allmnJ.)

Interior Department National Park System. National Park System (Wall Map Poster). Interior Department National Park System, Print.

A beautiful wall map of the National Parks is available from the Government Printing Office Bookstorehttps://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/024-005-01274-5?ctid=507. “Handsome color map showing the locations of parks in National Park System; suitable for large wall map displays … the map shows all 392 authorized units of the park system. It measures 39 by 29 inches and is of display quality.

Washington State

“National Historic Landmarks Survey / Washington.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. Available online: <https://www.nps.gov/nhl/find/statelists/wa/WA.pdf.>

“National Parks Road Trip: Pacific Northwest.” National Geographic. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016.  Available online: <http://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/road-trips/united-states/washington-national-parks/>.

Covers North Cascades, Mount Ranier and Olympic national parks.

Photograph of data sheet Working with Washington by the Numbers

Working with Washington by the Numbers National Park Service

 

“NHLs in National Parks | National Historic Landmarks Program.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/nhl/find/nhlsinparks.htm#WA>.
Northwest · National Parks Conservation Association.” National Parks Conservation Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.npca.org/regions/northwest>.

Working with Washington by the numbers.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 14 July 2016. <http://bit.ly/2a4PHoO>.

How many national parks are there in Washington State?

National Trails?

National Register of Historic Places?

National Historic Landmarks?

National Natural Landmarks?

World Heritage Sites?

“Want to Browse Some National Park Maps? There’s a Site For That | Smart News.” Smithsonian. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <http://bit.ly/2a4SS0o>. 

Check National Park Maps. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 July 2016, http://npmaps.com/. Free maps of national parks. Check by state.

“Washington: National Register of Historic Places listings in the state of Washington.” Flickr. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalregister/albums/72157620544261128>.

Washington (U.S. National Park Service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 14 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/state/wa/index.htm>.  Find a list of National Park Service designations, a description and a photo.

Photo compilation of National Park Service brochures

National Park Service brochures. Listed in the Washington State Library catalog.

Publications

“Publications (U.S. National Park Service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/aboutus/publications.htm>.
The National Park Service explains decisions, documents information, and shares knowledge through a variety of publications, many of which are available online. This online library includes both contemporary and historical reports.

Periodicals

Virtual Stacks by Topic

NPS Public Databases

(may be useful for casual browsers or serious researchers)

Additional Publications

  • National Parks Index (6.4MB PDF): This index is a complete administrative listing of the National Park System’s areas and related areas.

Braille Books: The National Park Service publishes a series of visitor information brochures in Braille for most of the NPS designated areas in the United States. They are included in this resource list with the designation Print (Braille).

Ebey’s Landing

Photograph of Ebey's Landing. Photo by James Marvin Phelps.

Ebey’s Landing. Photo by James Marvin Phelps.

Evans-Hatch, Gail E. H. Evans-Hatch, D. Michael. Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve: Historic Resources Study. Washington: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, 2005. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.58/3:W 57.

Polenz, Michael. Slaughter, Stephen L. Dragovich, Joe D. Thorsen, Gerald W. Geologic Map of the Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Island County, Washington. Olympia N.p., Washington State Dept. Print. Available at WSL: 2 copies, one in library use only WA 33.7 G291ope 2005-2 2005 c.1 ; available for circulation  WA 333.7G291ope 2005-2 2005 c.2.

United States. National Park Service. Ebey’s Landing: Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Washington. Washington: National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, 2008. Print (map). Available at WSL: I 29.2:EB 3/2.

United States. National Park Service, author. Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2015. Print (Braille). Available at WSL: I 29.155:EB 3.

Gilbert, Cathy. Reading the Cultural Landscape: Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. Seattle: National Park Service, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Cultural Resource Division, 1985. Print. Online at: http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS115589.

Photograph of a building on Officers Row, Fort Vancouver, Vancouver, Washington.

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Officers Row, Vancouver, WA

Fort Vancouver

Hussey, John A. Fort Vancouver National Historic Site/washington. Denver: Denver Service Center, National Park Service, 1972-1976. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.2:F77.

United States. National Park Service, author. Fort Vancouver: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2013. Print (Braille).
Available at WSL! I 29.2:F 77 v/2/ v.1, I 29.2:F 77 v/2/ v.2.

Tip: check our catalog for author John A. Hussey to find other studies he did of Fort Vancouver.

Lake Chelan

Northwest Interpretive Association. North Cascades National Park Service Complex (Agency : U.S.). Imus Creek Nature Trail, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. Seattle: The Assn., 1998. Print. WSL Northwest Collection NW 917.975 IMUS 1998?

Tip: See also North Cascades National Park.

“Welcome to Stehekin.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/upload/Stehekin-Map-2010.pdf>.

Lake Roosevelt

Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area, Washington. Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, 2005. Print (map). Available at WSL: I 29.39:R 67.

 Mount Rainier

“An icon on the horizon.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/mora/index.htm>.

Mount Rainier National Park: Washington. Washington, D.C.: The Service, 1973. Print (Maps). Available at WSL: Historic Research R 912.7977 United 1973.

 “Publications – Mount Rainier National Park (U.S. National Park Service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/publications.htm>.

Tahoma News
The Mount Rainier National Park “Tahoma News” is printed each winter, spring, summer and fall. Look inside for descriptions of seasonal activities, current events and facility hours … read the most recent edition on-line or receive a printed copy when you arrive at the entrance gate to the park.

United States. National Park Service, author. Mount Rainier, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2016. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:M 86 R/2.

North Cascades National Park (and surounding areas)

Johannessen, Tracie B, Wendy Scherrer, Saul Weisberg, and Nikki McClure. North Cascades National Park: A Living Classroom : a Guide to Field Trips and Activities in Ross Lake National Recreation Area and North Cascades National Park. Sedro-Wooley: North Cascades Institute, 1996. Print. Available at WSL: NW OVERSIZ 917.9773 JOHANNE 19.

“North Cascades are calling.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/index.htm>.

“North Cascades National Park Complex.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. Available online at <https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/NOCAmap1.pdf>.

“North Cascades National Park Complex Stephen Mather Wilderness.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/Wilderness-Trip-Planner-2016-05-06_01-for-web.pdf>.

 North Cascades National Park Service Complex. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 July 2016. <https://www.facebook.com/NorthCascadesNationalPark/>.

Popular Trails: Featuring Trails in North Cascades National Park & Ross Lake National Recreation Area. Seattle: Northwest Interpretive Assn., 2000. Print. Available at WSL: NW 917.975 POPULAR 200-?.

“Surrounding region.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. Available online at: https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/NOCAmap2.pdf.

“State route 20 detail map.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/SR-20-Detail.pdf.

Photograph of greenery in a rain forest of the Olympic National Park

Rain Forest Greenery along the shores of the Quinalt River. Photograph by Alan posted to Flickr. Used by copyright permission.

Olympic Mountains

 “Olympic National Forest – Maps & Publications.” US Forest Service. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016.

Olympic National Park, Washington. Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, 1939- . Print (Maps). Available at WSL: I 29.6OI 9/3 1939-2003 some issues missing.

“Olympic National Park Guide.” Sunset. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <http://www.sunset.com/travel/northwest/olympic-national-park-washington>.

United States. National Park Service, author. Olympic: Olympic National Park, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2015. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:OL 9.

Ross Lake National Recreation Area

“Ross Lake National Recreation Area.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/rosslake_6-08.pdf>.

Tip: See also North Cascades National Park

Photo of the Crook house with family on the porch from Jim Crook House, San Juan Island.

Crook House historic structures. English Camp, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan Island, Washington

San Juan Island

Erigero, Patricia, and Barry Schnoll. Crook House Historic Structures Report: English Camp, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan Island, Washington. Seattle: Cultural Resources Division, Pacific Northwest Region, National Park Service, 1984. Web.  Available at WSL:  I 29.88:C 88. Available online through the Library’s Washington Rural Heritage project: bit.ly/29X2ZEs

United States. National Park Service, author. San Juan Island National Historical Park, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:SA 5 J/2.

Whitman Mission

United States. National Park Service, author. Whitman Mission National Historic Site, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL: I 29.155:W 59.

United States. National Park Service. Whitman Mission, Sitio Histórico Nacional, Washington.  N.p.,  Print. Available at WSL:
I 29.6/6:W 59/SPAN.

Photograph showing the Whitman Mission historic site with the Oregon Trail and Mission Monument

Site of the Whitman Mission National Historic Site. Photograph by Glenn Scofield Williams as found on Flickr. Used by copyright permission.

Washington and Other States

Klondike Gold Rush

United States. National Park Service. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Seattle, Washington. Washington: National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1981. Print (map). Available at WSL: I 29.6:K 69/W 27.

United States. National Park Service, author. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Skagway, Alaska. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! I 29.155:K 69

United States. National Park Service, author. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Skagway, Alaska. N.p., 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL: I 29.155.G29.

Lewis and Clark

United States. National Park Service, author. Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks, Oregon / washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! I 29.155:L 58

Mcloughlin House Fort Vancouver

United States. National Park Service, author. Mcloughlin House Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Oregon/washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2013. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:M 22

Manhatten Project National Historical Park (Oak Ridge, TN, Los Alamos, NM, and Hanford, WA)

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Natural Resources. Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation, author. H.r. 1208, to Establish the Manhattan Project National Historical Park in Oak Ridge, Tn, Los Alamos, Nm, and Hanford, Wa: Legislative Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation of the Committee on Natural Resources, U.s. House of Representatives, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, First Session, Friday, April 12, 2013. N.p., 2014. Web. Available at WSL: WSL Annex (Call ahead) Y 4.R 31/3:113-10, MICRO Y 4.R 31/3:113-10 ; Available online at <http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo47105> <http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo47106>.

Manzanar

United States. National Park Service, author. Manzanar, Manzanar National Historic Site, California. National Park Service US Department of this Interior, 2016. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:M 31/2

Minidoka

United States. National Park Service, author. Minidoka, Minidoka National Historic Site, Idaho/washington. National Park Service, US Department of the Interior, 2016. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! I 29.155:M 66/2

Nez Perce

United States. National Park Service. Visitor Guide: Nez Perce National Historical Park, Big Hole National Battlefield, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington.  Lapwai: Nez Perce National Historical Park, 2009.  Print.  Available at WSL: I 29.2:N 49/2 2009

Photograph of logo banner of the Listen Up! oral history program.

Listen Up! North Olympic Library System. Oral histories from the Washington Northwest corner. Used by permission of the North Olympic Library System. Project supported by the Washington State Library Washington Rural Heritage Project using federal Library Services and Technology Act funds administered by the Institute for Museum and Library Services.

 Oral History

Listen up! Stories from the Northwest corner. A series of oral histories collected by staff of the North Olympic Library System from residents of Clallam County sharing their stories about National Parks. There are 16 recorded interviews plus a compilation video.

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National Park Service – One Hundred Years

August 3rd, 2016 Rand Simmons Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services, State Library Collections Comments Off on National Park Service – One Hundred Years

Golden-mantled ground squirrel

Golden-mantled ground squirrel at Crater Lake NP. These little guys will steal your sunflower seeds and your heart. Photo by Tore.

This August 25th the National Parks Service (NPS) celebrates one hundred years of service to the nation and, indeed, to the world. The year was 1916, but national parks, designated by various federal agencies, have existed far longer than the NPS.  The first was the District of Columbia, authorized on July 16, 1790. It included the National Capital Parks, National Mall and the White House.

Crater Lake

Summer view of Crater Lake NP, Oregon. Photo by Maciek Lulko.

My personal relationship with National Parks was shaped by where I was born and where my father was born.

I was born in Canyonville, Oregon in Douglas County and spent my childhood in the little burg of Myrtle Creek. It was easy for my family to head to Crater Lake in the Oregon Cascade Mountains.

Established in 1902 as a national park, Crater Lake National Park predates the establishment of NPS and is the only national park in Oregon. An eruption of Mt. Mazama, a volcano in the Oregon Cascade Mountains, caused an implosion of the mountain and formed the lake. It is the deepest in the United States, has no inlets or outlets, and the blue of the water is almost indescribable. You can learn more about this the deepest lake in the United State at this site. Two childhood memories: Trying to spy the wizard on Wizard Island, the larger of two islands in the caldera-formed lake and, second, trying as I might to catch one of the wily park chipmunks or ground squirrels. No doubt I would have rued the results had I caught one.

Photo of house submerged into water and highway 287 slumped into lake  as a result of the Hebegen Earthquake also known as the Yellowstone Earthquake.

State Highway 287 slumped into Hebgen Lake.

My father was born and raised in Eastern Idaho. On the occasions that we would go to visit my aunts, uncles and dozens of cousins we would often make a trek to Yellowstone National Park. All my memories of Yellowstone are positive except for three — first, visiting the devastation caused by the Madison River flood in 1959 and seeing the ghostly lines of trees along the bank of the water marking the water level when the river was dammed and formed Quake Lake. That visit formed an indelible memory in my brain. Second, sadness upon learning that Old Faithful geyser was no longer predictable as a result of the same earthquake.  And finally, as an adult with two young sons, viewing the damage of the great fire of 1988 and remembering stories effectively told by a park ranger.

This August we will celebrate 100 years of the marvelous work of the National Park Service through posts to our blog, Facebook site and Twitter account (look for #NPSCentennial). We will focus on Washington State’s national parks and feature other Washington NPS sites. We will connect you to resources in our collections. We hope we will inspire you to take pride in our historic and cultural treasures made possible by the stewardship of the National Park Service.

What is your connection to National Parks? A funny/scary story of a woman in a car that tried to feed a bear? Leaning over a guard railing to see what was in the canyon below while your dad held on to your shirt tail? Catching your first rainbow trout? Seeing your first moose? A solemn moment at a national historic site? A family reunion? The antics of ground squirrels stuffing their cheeks with peanuts tossed to them by tourist?

What’s your story? We would like to hear it. Or maybe you want to build some memories.

Here’s to another great 100 years of service to the people of the United States and the world.

Resources

The National Parks: Index. Washington, D.C: National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, 1985. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.103:  2012-2016

The National Park Service released its 2012-2016 Index in time for the Centennial celebration. This is a must have for travelers especially if they are visiting multiple National Parks and other national sites, reserves and recreation areas maintained by the NPS.

“This index is a complete administrative listing of the National Park System’s parks and related areas, including historical documentation to distinguish between the types of National Park Service sites. It has been revised to reflect congressional actions. The entries, grouped by state, include administrative addresses and phone numbers, dates of authorization and establishment, boundary change dates, acreages, website addresses, and brief statements explaining the areas’ national significance.” However, this book is not intended as a guide for park visitors. “This resource should provide beneficial information to historians, especially State historians.” (Both quotes, GPO Bookstore, June 28, 2016).

Centennial junior ranger activity book. Not distributed to Federal Depository libraries. Available from the Government Printing Office.

McDonnell, Janet, and Barry Mackintosh. The National Parks: Shaping the System. Washington, D.C: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, 2005. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.2:SH 2/2005; Online at: https://ia800301.us.archive.org/20/items/nationalparkssha05system/nationalparkssha05system.pdf (other formats are available)

“US National Parks Timeline.” Travel, Landscape, and Nature Pictures – QT Luong Stock Photos and Fine Art Prints. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 June 2016. http://www.terragalleria.com/parks/info/parks-by-date.html.

Check out the Government Bookstore’s National Parks Collection, National Parks. U.S. Government Bookstore. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 June 2016.

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