WA Secretary of State Blogs

WSL Updates for March 16, 2017

March 16th, 2017 Will Stuivenga Posted in Digital Collections, For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

Volume 13, March 16, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) WASHINGTON RURAL HERITAGE GRANTS

2) USER EXPERIENCE JUMPSTART

3) METADATA CLEANUP GRANTS

4) ONECLICK 2017 RENEWAL

5) LIBRARY 2.017 VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Centralia Daily Hub

February 21st, 2017 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public Comments Off on Centralia Daily Hub

From the desk of Nikki Chiampa

The Centralia Daily Hub began as an Independent newspaper on September 29, 1913 with editor George A. Dew and publisher Madison “Elsy” Ellsworth Cue at the helm. The other publisher of the paper was the Hub Printing Company, Inc., an enterprise of which Cue was president. The Daily Hub was issued every afternoon with the exception of Sundays, reporting on both international and local news. Within a year of its inception, circulation of the paper had risen to approximately 1,141 issues, with distribution in Centralia and surrounding towns. During this time, Dew left his post at the paper and was succeeded by Victor Jackson. When Jackson left the paper in 1915, Cue ended up taking on the editorial role as well.

Significant events, including WW1, Women’s Suffrage, and Prohibition initially appeared as headlines on the front page. As time wore on, however, the newspaper shifted its focus to cover more socially inclined news on a local scale. The Daily Hub often took on a moral stance and eschewed objective reporting in its articles. When referring to the “drys,” those fighting for Prohibition, the paper describes the group as the “better element of this city.” In contrast, it berates the “clique” of local bankers and businessmen, declaring that these men defrauded the city during Centralia’s financial crisis of 1914. The Daily Hub remained righteous even when the topic was not political, expressing outrage at provocative movie posters on display at a local theater. The paper claims that “those whose mission it is to uplift, protest, and help to a better living” were being careless and slothful with their duties.

By its third year of publication, The Daily Hub was boasting of its “clear conscience” and the enemies it has gained, labeling their opponents as the “lawless and predatory” populace of Centralia. However, staff of The Daily Hub were not immune to the consequences of their antagonism. In one case, Vera Reynolds, a staff writer, was arraigned in court for libel. She alleged in one of her articles that prosecuting attorney Chester Alan Studebaker and Sheriff Thomas C. Foster were “laid out” by Frank Nehring, whom they were attempting to arrest. Even The Daily Hub’s publisher, M.E. Cue, was tried in court multiple times and charged in 1916 for throwing a pig of linotype metal at Joe Lucas, a local theater manager.

After only five years and with 2,228 papers in circulation, The Daily Hub officially ceased publication on March 30, 1918. It was succeeded by The Centralia Evening Hub, which ran for the month of April that same year. Immediately thereafter, it transformed into the Republican paper, The Centralia Daily Hub, which was issued from May 1, 1918 until publication was suspended on April 10, 1919. During these rapid changes, M.E. Cue and his company remained as publishers up to the final issue of the paper’s demise. Although the Centralia Daily Hub announced plans to return from its “sabbatical,” it had no successors.

The Centralia Daily Hub along with many other early Washington newspapers can be found on our Washington Digital Newspapers website.

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Digital Projects: Year in Review 2016

December 29th, 2016 Nikki Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public Comments Off on Digital Projects: Year in Review 2016

As 2016 comes to a close, we here at Washington Rural Heritage are at a crossroads. We’re steadily working with our grantees on this past year’s collections, and at the same time, we’re looking forward to the new projects that we will be helping with next year. But before we get ahead of ourselves, let’s take the time to stop and reflect on what our community has accomplished from 2015 to 2016 in their efforts to preserve Washington’s cultural heritage.

Highlights of these collections include:

  • Asotin County Library’s collection now has images by the photographer, Asahel Curtis, providing a glimpse at everyday life during the turn of the century in eastern Washington, as well as a collection of postcards, which span the first half of the 20th century.
  • The Ellensburg Public Library has digitized various items in City of Ellensburg’s art collection. Included in this selection are works by local artist, muralist, and author, Ernest R. Norling.

  • Continuing the theme of Washington based artists, the La Conner Regional Library collaborated with the Museum of Northwest Art and Western Washington University to create a collection that highlights the works, ephemera, and personal letters of three members of the Northwest School art movement.
  • The Port Angeles Public Library of the North Olympic Library System has expanded upon its already sizable collection of photographs and negatives donated by Bert Kellogg. Notable additions include images of Olympic Peninsula tribes, as well as maritime photos of the Northwest.
  • Kettle Falls Public Library has added to its collection of local history. Included in this year’s project are images of local residents, Kettle Falls, and a “bunny”
  • The Whitman County Library has collaborated with a number of institutions this year, combining items from the Staley Museum, the City of Colfax, and the Colfax Fire Department, as well as private holdings, which were all added to Whitman County’s 2015 collection. The diversity of items in this year’s project is reflected in the cultural artifacts, which include women’s clothing, farm equipment, uniforms, and badges.

 

 

 

 

Digitization of these collections in 2015-2016 was accomplished with a grant award from the Washington State Library, funded by the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) through the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Washington public and tribal libraries will be eligible for our next round of digitization grants to be announced in early 2017. Questions about the grant opportunity should be directed to Evan Robb, Digital Repository Librarian, evan.robb@sos.wa.gov, (360) 704-5228.

 

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WSL Updates for December 1, 2016

November 30th, 2016 Shirley Lewis Posted in Digital Collections, For Libraries, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates Comments Off on WSL Updates for December 1, 2016

Volume 12, December 1, 2016 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) FINDING SOMETHING TO READ NOW WEBINAR

2) MORE TITLES IN WASHINGTON DIGITAL NEWSPAPERS

3) FREE LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES THROUGH WSL

4) GALE PUBLIC LIBRARY RENEWAL

5) REFERENCE SERVICES COURSE ONLINE

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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WSL Updates for November 17, 2016

November 17th, 2016 Shirley Lewis Posted in Digital Collections, For Libraries, Grants and Funding, Letters About Literature, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates Comments Off on WSL Updates for November 17, 2016

Volume 12, November 17, 2016 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) UPCOMING PROQUEST TRAINING

2) WASHINGTON RURAL HERITAGE NAMED A BEST SITE

3) LETTERS ABOUT LITERATURE CONTEST

4) 2ND ANNUAL HISTORICAL ZINE CONTEST

5) NEA BIG READ ACCEPTING GRANT APPLICATIONS

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Tale of a torn wagon cover

October 12th, 2016 Evan Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For the Public Comments Off on Tale of a torn wagon cover

Steamboat_theCOLUMBIA Magazine contributor Lionel Youst recently contacted us to identify a ca. 1901-1905 photo of a covered wagon (at right). The wagon is depicted aboard the Columbia River steamboat Charles R. Spencer. This badly-faded albumen print is from the Stevenson Community Library’s Skamania County Heritage digital collection (click image to see full record). Despite the photo’s poor condition, Youst spotted something about the wagon’s canvas cover—a large tear. It made him recall a detail from the reminiscences of his grandfather. Here’s what he told us:

“My grandparents, Frank and Alice Youst sold their homestead in Woods County, Oklahoma Territory and headed toward Centralia, Washington on August 22, 1903. [Their family of five] stopped and worked the horses at railroad construction and mining jobs on the way out. The canvas sheet [on the family’s wagon] was badly torn when it tipped over trying to go around a slide on the road over the Rocky Mountains. Dad said it was too hard to sew, and it remained torn all the way out to Centralia. I think what we see on the left side bottom of the sheet is a tear—bigger than I thought it would be, but that could be it.”

SK0228-Edit-Grayscale With a bit of assistance from his friend Shirley Bridgham, Youst was able to tease a bit more detail out of the faded photo—click on the image at left to see a full-sized version of the optimized photo.

In addition to the tear, other details about the photo line up with Youst’s grandfather’s recollections.

“The last leg of the journey was from Tonopah, Nevada where Grandad was hauling ore. They came up through Eastern Oregon to Prineville and Madras, and on to The Dalles where they took passage on a steamboat with the three horses, the wagon, and the family, down through the Cascade Locks to Vancouver. They arrived in in Centralia, Washington on June 26, 1904, after 308 days on the road, a family of five living out of that wagon. They certainly boarded the steamboat at The Dalles on or about June 20, 1904—give or take two or three days.”

While we don’t have an exact date for the original photo, we do know that this photo was very likely taken at Cascade Locks (across the Columbia River from Stevenson), between 1901 and 1905, and that the Charles R. Spencer was one of the two steamboats running The Dalles to Portland/Vancouver route at that time.

So is it his grandparents’ wagon?  According to Youst: “If it isn’t…it’s close enough!” For a detailed account of Youst’s family’s journey, see his upcoming article in COLUMBIA: The Magazine of Northwest History.

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Classics in Washington History – Army letters from an Officer’s Wife, 1871 – 1888

August 26th, 2016 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public, State Library Collections Comments Off on Classics in Washington History – Army letters from an Officer’s Wife, 1871 – 1888

From the desk of Jeff Martin Frances M.A. Roe

Army letters from an Officer’s Wife, written by: Frances M.A. Roe

Appleton And Company, New York and London

Publication date: October 1909

Note: In 1871, Lieutenant Colonel Fayette Washington Roe (1850-1916) was sent to Fort Lyon, Colorado Territory. His wife, Frances M.A. Roe, describes their experiences while stationed at the fort in this collection of letters.

“It is late, so this can be only a note to tell you that we arrived here safely, and will take the stage for Fort Lyon to-morrow morning at six o’clock. I am thankful enough that our stay is short at this terrible place, where one feels there is danger of being murdered any minute. Not one woman have I seen here, but there are men any number of dreadful-looking men each one armed with big pistols, and leather belts full of cartridges. But the houses we saw as we came from the station were worse even than the men. They looked, in the moonlight, like huge cakes of clay, where spooks and creepy things might be found. The hotel is much like the houses, and appears to have been made of dirt, and a few drygoods boxes. Even the low roof is of dirt. The whole place is horrible, and dismal beyond description, and just why anyone lives here I cannot understand.”

Excerpt by Frances M.A. Roe

Washington State Library Electronic State Publications – Army Letters From An Officers Wife, 1909

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2nd Annual Zine Contest

August 26th, 2016 Judy Pitchford Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public Comments Off on 2nd Annual Zine Contest

2nd Annual Zine ContestDo you like history? Do you enjoy creative projects? Well, do we have something for you!

Washington State Library, a division of the Office of the Secretary of State, is sponsoring the 2nd Annual Historical Zine Contest with co-sponsors Washington State Archives and Timberland Regional Library. Participants are asked to create a Zine about some aspect of Washington History.

Washington residents from 4th grade and up (yes, adults, too!) are asked to participate.

Don’t know how to make a zine? Visit our Zine webpage and watch a video that shows how.

All three sponsors have a multitude of resources that can provide fantastic material to use in the creations of participants.

  • Washington State Library has many online resources that include books, maps, newspapers and photos. You can also find featured images from these digital collections on their Pinterest and Flickr pages. And don’t forget that you can visit the library to see some resources in person!
  • Washington State Archives has an extensive print collection, as well as many images at the Digital Archives.
  • And you can visit the Timberland Libraries to explore their NW Reference Collection, Zine Collection and Zine Resource Collection.

Entries will be accepted from September 1, 2016 – December 15, 2016. So start creating!

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Mount Rainier National Park – National Park Service – Celebrating 100 Years of Service

August 23rd, 2016 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public Comments Off on Mount Rainier National Park – National Park Service – Celebrating 100 Years of Service

Skiing at Mount Rainier National Park

For many people when they think of Washington State the first thing that comes to mind is Mount Rainier. The tallest peak in the state, at 14,410 feet above sea level, Mount Rainier dominates the landscape on both the east and west side of the state and all Washingtonians feel that it is “their mountain.”

On March 2, 1899, Mount Rainier was established as the fifth national park, named so by William McKinley.  The park is a veritable year round wonderland for those who love the outdoors. Possibilities range from fishing, bike riding, hiking, camping, and climbing in the summer, to skiing, tubing and snowshoeing in the winter. For those who like to just sit and admire the scenery, Longmire and Paradise each has a beautiful old inn. Also within the park boundaries are 228,480 acres of wilderness.

But before Mount Rainier became a national park there was of course a long history to the area including Native American legend.  One of the missions of the State Library, that we take very seriously, is to preserve the history of our state. We have many books in our catalog but for this blog post the focus is on our Digital Collections.  In order to make our materials easily accessible, we’ve been working for many years to digitize public domain books and journals in our collection.

When it comes to Mount Rainier, one of the best historic resources is Edmond Meany’s “Mount Rainier: a record of exploration”. This book is a collection of essays about the mountain including its discovery by George Vancouver, the story of the first accent by Hazard Stevens, the natural history of the mountain and an essay on the creation of the park.

Another source for history is our digital newspapers collection.  In the early days of our state Mount Rainier was often called “Mt. Tacoma” or “Mt. Tahoma”, the Native American name. This fact is acknowledged in Meany’s book and born out in the controversy over the name of the new national park.
In the March 7th Seattle Post Intelligencer an article titled “An insult to Tacoma” heatedly defends the name Rainier. “Some foolish people, including the Ledger, past and present, have tried to change the name of Rainier to Tacoma, but they have failed… If Mount Rainier is worthy of the distinction of a national park, the park should bear the name of the mountain.”Mount Rainier ad

Over the years Mount Rainier remained newsworthy, with articles such as the May 12, 1916 Washington Standard’s “Mt. Rainier’s Flowers – Unequaled in Beauty, Number and Luxuriance, says Uncle Sam” .  In 1910 The Walla Walla Evening Statesman proposed regulating automobiles in the park, however by December 7, 1920 an article in the Seattle Star instead proposed new roads to increase access and travel to the park.

As a Federal Depository the State Library also holds electronic federal documents for the state.  A search of our catalog unearthed “WONDERLAND: An Administrative History of Mount Rainier National Park” by Theodore Catton. This book records the history of the park from the days before it’s designation as a national park  through the end of the 20th century.

Having a national park in Washington also generated a lot of tourist interest and tourist dollars.  The early newspapers show evidence of efforts to take advantage of this.  You find advertisements for tours and postcards, even gasoline to get you there.  Today Mount Rainier continues to be a centerpiece of our state with an average of 1-2 million people visiting each year.  Have you visited lately?

Image sources:

“Gorgeous Mt. Rainier.” Pullman Herald 10 June 1921. Web. 14 July 2016.

Skiing at Mount Rainier National Park

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National Parks Service in Washington State (parks, reserves, historic sites, etc.)

August 8th, 2016 Rand Simmons Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services, State Library Collections Comments Off on National Parks Service in Washington State (parks, reserves, historic sites, etc.)

Photograph of Liberty Mountain, North Cascades National Park.

Liberty Mountain, North Cascades National Park. Photo by Jim Culp. Used by permission.

Selected Resources

National Park Service

2016 marks the centennial anniversary of the National Park Service. “That’s 100 years of protecting America’s natural, historical and cultural treasures from all over the United States. These more than 400 beautiful, historic and exquisite sites cover over 80 million acres consisting of approximately 18,000 miles of trails, more than 75,000 archaeological sites and at least 247 species of threatened or endangered plants and animals.” (Text from http://bit.ly/2allmnJ.)

Interior Department National Park System. National Park System (Wall Map Poster). Interior Department National Park System, Print.

A beautiful wall map of the National Parks is available from the Government Printing Office Bookstorehttps://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/024-005-01274-5?ctid=507. “Handsome color map showing the locations of parks in National Park System; suitable for large wall map displays … the map shows all 392 authorized units of the park system. It measures 39 by 29 inches and is of display quality.

Washington State

“National Historic Landmarks Survey / Washington.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. Available online: <https://www.nps.gov/nhl/find/statelists/wa/WA.pdf.>

“National Parks Road Trip: Pacific Northwest.” National Geographic. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016.  Available online: <http://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/road-trips/united-states/washington-national-parks/>.

Covers North Cascades, Mount Ranier and Olympic national parks.

Photograph of data sheet Working with Washington by the Numbers

Working with Washington by the Numbers National Park Service

 

“NHLs in National Parks | National Historic Landmarks Program.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/nhl/find/nhlsinparks.htm#WA>.
Northwest · National Parks Conservation Association.” National Parks Conservation Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.npca.org/regions/northwest>.

Working with Washington by the numbers.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 14 July 2016. <http://bit.ly/2a4PHoO>.

How many national parks are there in Washington State?

National Trails?

National Register of Historic Places?

National Historic Landmarks?

National Natural Landmarks?

World Heritage Sites?

“Want to Browse Some National Park Maps? There’s a Site For That | Smart News.” Smithsonian. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <http://bit.ly/2a4SS0o>. 

Check National Park Maps. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 July 2016, http://npmaps.com/. Free maps of national parks. Check by state.

“Washington: National Register of Historic Places listings in the state of Washington.” Flickr. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalregister/albums/72157620544261128>.

Washington (U.S. National Park Service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 14 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/state/wa/index.htm>.  Find a list of National Park Service designations, a description and a photo.

Photo compilation of National Park Service brochures

National Park Service brochures. Listed in the Washington State Library catalog.

Publications

“Publications (U.S. National Park Service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/aboutus/publications.htm>.
The National Park Service explains decisions, documents information, and shares knowledge through a variety of publications, many of which are available online. This online library includes both contemporary and historical reports.

Periodicals

Virtual Stacks by Topic

NPS Public Databases

(may be useful for casual browsers or serious researchers)

Additional Publications

  • National Parks Index (6.4MB PDF): This index is a complete administrative listing of the National Park System’s areas and related areas.

Braille Books: The National Park Service publishes a series of visitor information brochures in Braille for most of the NPS designated areas in the United States. They are included in this resource list with the designation Print (Braille).

Ebey’s Landing

Photograph of Ebey's Landing. Photo by James Marvin Phelps.

Ebey’s Landing. Photo by James Marvin Phelps.

Evans-Hatch, Gail E. H. Evans-Hatch, D. Michael. Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve: Historic Resources Study. Washington: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, 2005. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.58/3:W 57.

Polenz, Michael. Slaughter, Stephen L. Dragovich, Joe D. Thorsen, Gerald W. Geologic Map of the Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Island County, Washington. Olympia N.p., Washington State Dept. Print. Available at WSL: 2 copies, one in library use only WA 33.7 G291ope 2005-2 2005 c.1 ; available for circulation  WA 333.7G291ope 2005-2 2005 c.2.

United States. National Park Service. Ebey’s Landing: Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Washington. Washington: National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, 2008. Print (map). Available at WSL: I 29.2:EB 3/2.

United States. National Park Service, author. Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2015. Print (Braille). Available at WSL: I 29.155:EB 3.

Gilbert, Cathy. Reading the Cultural Landscape: Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. Seattle: National Park Service, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Cultural Resource Division, 1985. Print. Online at: http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS115589.

Photograph of a building on Officers Row, Fort Vancouver, Vancouver, Washington.

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Officers Row, Vancouver, WA

Fort Vancouver

Hussey, John A. Fort Vancouver National Historic Site/washington. Denver: Denver Service Center, National Park Service, 1972-1976. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.2:F77.

United States. National Park Service, author. Fort Vancouver: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2013. Print (Braille).
Available at WSL! I 29.2:F 77 v/2/ v.1, I 29.2:F 77 v/2/ v.2.

Tip: check our catalog for author John A. Hussey to find other studies he did of Fort Vancouver.

Lake Chelan

Northwest Interpretive Association. North Cascades National Park Service Complex (Agency : U.S.). Imus Creek Nature Trail, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. Seattle: The Assn., 1998. Print. WSL Northwest Collection NW 917.975 IMUS 1998?

Tip: See also North Cascades National Park.

“Welcome to Stehekin.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/upload/Stehekin-Map-2010.pdf>.

Lake Roosevelt

Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area, Washington. Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, 2005. Print (map). Available at WSL: I 29.39:R 67.

 Mount Rainier

“An icon on the horizon.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/mora/index.htm>.

Mount Rainier National Park: Washington. Washington, D.C.: The Service, 1973. Print (Maps). Available at WSL: Historic Research R 912.7977 United 1973.

 “Publications – Mount Rainier National Park (U.S. National Park Service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/publications.htm>.

Tahoma News
The Mount Rainier National Park “Tahoma News” is printed each winter, spring, summer and fall. Look inside for descriptions of seasonal activities, current events and facility hours … read the most recent edition on-line or receive a printed copy when you arrive at the entrance gate to the park.

United States. National Park Service, author. Mount Rainier, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2016. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:M 86 R/2.

North Cascades National Park (and surounding areas)

Johannessen, Tracie B, Wendy Scherrer, Saul Weisberg, and Nikki McClure. North Cascades National Park: A Living Classroom : a Guide to Field Trips and Activities in Ross Lake National Recreation Area and North Cascades National Park. Sedro-Wooley: North Cascades Institute, 1996. Print. Available at WSL: NW OVERSIZ 917.9773 JOHANNE 19.

“North Cascades are calling.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/index.htm>.

“North Cascades National Park Complex.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. Available online at <https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/NOCAmap1.pdf>.

“North Cascades National Park Complex Stephen Mather Wilderness.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/Wilderness-Trip-Planner-2016-05-06_01-for-web.pdf>.

 North Cascades National Park Service Complex. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 July 2016. <https://www.facebook.com/NorthCascadesNationalPark/>.

Popular Trails: Featuring Trails in North Cascades National Park & Ross Lake National Recreation Area. Seattle: Northwest Interpretive Assn., 2000. Print. Available at WSL: NW 917.975 POPULAR 200-?.

“Surrounding region.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. Available online at: https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/NOCAmap2.pdf.

“State route 20 detail map.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/SR-20-Detail.pdf.

Photograph of greenery in a rain forest of the Olympic National Park

Rain Forest Greenery along the shores of the Quinalt River. Photograph by Alan posted to Flickr. Used by copyright permission.

Olympic Mountains

 “Olympic National Forest – Maps & Publications.” US Forest Service. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016.

Olympic National Park, Washington. Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, 1939- . Print (Maps). Available at WSL: I 29.6OI 9/3 1939-2003 some issues missing.

“Olympic National Park Guide.” Sunset. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <http://www.sunset.com/travel/northwest/olympic-national-park-washington>.

United States. National Park Service, author. Olympic: Olympic National Park, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2015. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:OL 9.

Ross Lake National Recreation Area

“Ross Lake National Recreation Area.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/rosslake_6-08.pdf>.

Tip: See also North Cascades National Park

Photo of the Crook house with family on the porch from Jim Crook House, San Juan Island.

Crook House historic structures. English Camp, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan Island, Washington

San Juan Island

Erigero, Patricia, and Barry Schnoll. Crook House Historic Structures Report: English Camp, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan Island, Washington. Seattle: Cultural Resources Division, Pacific Northwest Region, National Park Service, 1984. Web.  Available at WSL:  I 29.88:C 88. Available online through the Library’s Washington Rural Heritage project: bit.ly/29X2ZEs

United States. National Park Service, author. San Juan Island National Historical Park, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:SA 5 J/2.

Whitman Mission

United States. National Park Service, author. Whitman Mission National Historic Site, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL: I 29.155:W 59.

United States. National Park Service. Whitman Mission, Sitio Histórico Nacional, Washington.  N.p.,  Print. Available at WSL:
I 29.6/6:W 59/SPAN.

Photograph showing the Whitman Mission historic site with the Oregon Trail and Mission Monument

Site of the Whitman Mission National Historic Site. Photograph by Glenn Scofield Williams as found on Flickr. Used by copyright permission.

Washington and Other States

Klondike Gold Rush

United States. National Park Service. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Seattle, Washington. Washington: National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1981. Print (map). Available at WSL: I 29.6:K 69/W 27.

United States. National Park Service, author. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Skagway, Alaska. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! I 29.155:K 69

United States. National Park Service, author. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Skagway, Alaska. N.p., 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL: I 29.155.G29.

Lewis and Clark

United States. National Park Service, author. Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks, Oregon / washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! I 29.155:L 58

Mcloughlin House Fort Vancouver

United States. National Park Service, author. Mcloughlin House Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Oregon/washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2013. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:M 22

Manhatten Project National Historical Park (Oak Ridge, TN, Los Alamos, NM, and Hanford, WA)

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Natural Resources. Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation, author. H.r. 1208, to Establish the Manhattan Project National Historical Park in Oak Ridge, Tn, Los Alamos, Nm, and Hanford, Wa: Legislative Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation of the Committee on Natural Resources, U.s. House of Representatives, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, First Session, Friday, April 12, 2013. N.p., 2014. Web. Available at WSL: WSL Annex (Call ahead) Y 4.R 31/3:113-10, MICRO Y 4.R 31/3:113-10 ; Available online at <http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo47105> <http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo47106>.

Manzanar

United States. National Park Service, author. Manzanar, Manzanar National Historic Site, California. National Park Service US Department of this Interior, 2016. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:M 31/2

Minidoka

United States. National Park Service, author. Minidoka, Minidoka National Historic Site, Idaho/washington. National Park Service, US Department of the Interior, 2016. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! I 29.155:M 66/2

Nez Perce

United States. National Park Service. Visitor Guide: Nez Perce National Historical Park, Big Hole National Battlefield, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington.  Lapwai: Nez Perce National Historical Park, 2009.  Print.  Available at WSL: I 29.2:N 49/2 2009

Photograph of logo banner of the Listen Up! oral history program.

Listen Up! North Olympic Library System. Oral histories from the Washington Northwest corner. Used by permission of the North Olympic Library System. Project supported by the Washington State Library Washington Rural Heritage Project using federal Library Services and Technology Act funds administered by the Institute for Museum and Library Services.

 Oral History

Listen up! Stories from the Northwest corner. A series of oral histories collected by staff of the North Olympic Library System from residents of Clallam County sharing their stories about National Parks. There are 16 recorded interviews plus a compilation video.

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