WA Secretary of State Blogs

WSL Updates for September 14, 2017

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017 Posted in Digital Collections, For Libraries, News, Technology and Resources, Training and Continuing Education, Updates | Comments Off on WSL Updates for September 14, 2017


Volume 13, September 14, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include resources:

1) RESILIENCE RESOURCES

2) FREE BOOKS

3) THINK, DO, SHOW – SAVE THE DATE

4) THE FORGOTTEN WAR REMEMBERED

5) LATINO CULTURES RESOURCES

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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1) RESILIENCE RESOURCES

Many people around the country are facing difficult, trying times right now. Evacuees displaced by the recent hurricanes in Texas and along the southeastern seaboard states, immigrants, refugees, and others who have had to leave their homes may suffer increased anxiety and concern.

Feelings of worry, disbelief, fear, and anger are normal when dealing with situations that are out of our control. Many displaced people may want to find shelter at a public library, escape between the pages of a good book, attend a library program, or just feel connected to someone or something within their local community.

For helpful tips for libraries when providing services for evacuees, refugees, immigrants, and others who have been displaced and/or impacted by a recent crisis, check out the latest blog posting (partially quoted above) from the ALA ALSC Public Awareness Committee.

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2) FREE BOOKS

The Seattle Public Library Foundation and the Kitsap Regional Library generously donated books which were left over from their latest community reads to the Washington State Library for redistribution to libraries in Washington State for use as community read titles, classroom sets, or book club kits.

The Washington State Library has:

  • The Turner House by Angela Flournoy: 279 trade paperbacks
  • A Sudden Light by Garth Stein: 147 trade paperbacks. 14 hardback large print copies, and 23 audiobook copies.
  • The Painter by Peter Heller: 2 trade paperbacks.
  • The Secret of the Nightingale Palace by Dana Sachs: 1 trade paperback

A minimum of five copies per order is required. They can be a mix and match of titles. This is a first come, first serve process. Please contact Leanna Hammond with your request at leanna.hammond@sos.wa.gov.

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3) THINK, DO, SHOW – SAVE THE DATE

The Washington State Library is bringing the workshop Think, Do, Show – Telling the Library Story with Data to three locations in November. In this free, all-day workshop, you will learn practical, strategic methods for evaluating your library’s programs and services. Through a series of interactive exercises, you will discover how to collect and analyze your data, use your results to inform your strategic planning, management, and communication with stakeholders, and visually present your statistics in infographics and other formats to demonstrate your library’s impact.

Presenter Linda Hofschire is the Director of the Colorado State Library’s Library Research Service (LRS). She has more than 20 years of experience working in social science research and evaluation. At LRS, she manages a variety of research and evaluation projects including outcome-based evaluations of state library programs, and a national training event, the Research Institute for Public Libraries (RIPL).

  • November 13, 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Timberland Regional Library Service Center, 415 Tumwater Blvd SW, Tumwater
  • November 15, 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Whitman County Rural Library System, 102 S. Main Street, Colfax
  • November 17, 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., King County Library System Service Center, 960 Newport Way NW, Issaquah

All registration will be managed through the WSL online training calendar; watch for an announcement (coming soon) and then register online. Space is limited. Questions? Contact Mary Campbell at mary.campbell@sos.wa.gov or 360-570-5571.

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4) THE FORGOTTEN WAR REMEMBERED

Legacy Washington announces the opening of a new exhibit, Korea 65: The Forgotten War Remembered, that captures the stories of veterans and Korean Americans whose lives were influenced by the Korean War. The exhibit, housed in the lobby of the Secretary of State’s Office in the Capitol Building in Olympia, opens on September 14. Anyone visiting the state capitol is invited to stop by to view the exhibit. Those not able to visit in person may check out the project, available in its entirety, online. View or read both the subject profiles, and the exhibit.

Libraries may wish to purchase the Korea 65 book, which includes 13 unique stories of Washingtonians who were affected by the war. The $22.50 cost includes shipping. The book may be purchased online.

For teachers, Korea 65 lesson plans are available. Three-part mini-units are available free online for teachers to introduce the exhibit and project into their classroom.

Legacy Washington is a program of the Office of the Washington Secretary of State.

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5) LATINO CULTURES RESOURCES

Libraries across the country are working in a variety of ways to improve the full spectrum of library and information services for the approximately 58.6 million Spanish-speaking and Latino people in the US and build a diverse and inclusive profession.

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, which begins September 15, Google Cultural Institute has collaborated with more than 35 museums and institutions to launch a new platform on September 7 within Google Arts & Culture: Latino Cultures. The platform brings more than 2,500 Latino cultural artifacts online and—through immersive storytelling, 360-degree virtual tours, ultra-high-resolution imagery, and visual field trips—offers first-hand knowledge about the Latino experience in America.

The American Library Association’s President-Elect Loida Garcia-Febo says she is excited about this new resource, which she believes will help libraries continue to draw attention to the rich legacy of Latinos and Latinas across America. “Nationwide, libraries are celebrating Latino cultures by offering programs that highlight our music, cuisine, art, history, and leadership,” says Garcia-Febo. “I know this platform will be a great springboard as we continue to reshape our library collections to include Spanish-language and Latino-oriented materials.”

For more from ALA, use this shortcut: sos.wa.gov/q/Latino.

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6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

Monday, September 18

Tuesday, September 19

Wednesday, September 20

Thursday, September 21

Friday, September 22

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DISCLAIMER: The State Library regularly highlights third-party events and online resources as a way to alert the library community to training and resource opportunities.  By doing so, we are not endorsing the content of the event, nor promoting any specific product, but merely providing this information as an FYI to librarians who must then decide what is right for them.

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WSL Updates for April 10, 2014

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014 Posted in For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates | Comments Off on WSL Updates for April 10, 2014


Volume 10, April 10, 2014 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) DISASTER RELIEF GRANTS

2) SENIORS – ANOTHER KIND OF DIGITAL DIVIDE

3) DÍA! DIVERSITY IN ACTION

4) CELEBRATE NATIONAL LIBRARY WEEK

5) 2014 TEENS’ TOP TEN GIVEAWAY

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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1) DISASTER RELIEF GRANTS

The Libri Foundation is offering a limited number of special non-matching BOOKS FOR CHILDREN grants to libraries serving rural communities affected by recent hurricanes, floods, or other natural disasters. Libraries receiving these grants will be able to select $700 worth of new, quality, hardcover children’s books from the Foundation’s 600-title booklist. No local matching funds are required. Libraries will be qualified on an individual basis.

In general, county libraries should serve a population under 16,000 and town libraries should serve a population under 10,000 (usually under 5,000). Libraries should be in a rural area, have a limited operating budget, and an active children’s department. Please note: Rural is usually considered to be at least 30 miles from a city with a population over 40,000.

Application packets for these special grants may be requested by mail, telephone, or fax from The Libri Foundation. Applications must be postmarked by Thursday, May 15, 2014. Grants will be awarded Saturday, May 31, 2014. Information about the Disaster Relief Grants is available at www.librifoundation.org/relief.html. Contact information for the Libri Foundation may be found by visiting librifoundation.org.

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2) SENIORS – ANOTHER KIND OF DIGITAL DIVIDE

America’s seniors have historically been late adopters to the world of technology compared to their younger compatriots, but their movement into digital life continues to deepen, according to newly released data from the Pew Research Center. The report, Older Adults and Technology Use, takes advantage of a particularly large survey to examine both technology use by Americans ages 65 or older compared to the rest of the population, as well as usage within the senior population.

Two different groups of older Americans emerge: The first group (which leans toward younger, more highly educated, or more affluent seniors) has relatively substantial technology assets, and also has a positive view toward the benefits of online platforms. The other (which tends to be older and less affluent, often with significant challenges with health or disability) is largely disconnected from the world of digital tools and services, both physically and psychologically.

As the internet plays an increasingly central role in connecting Americans of all ages to news and information, government services, health resources, and opportunities for social support, these divisions are noteworthy—particularly for the many organizations (such as libraries) and individual caregivers who serve the older adult population.

To read a summary of findings, or access the entire report, visit sos.wa.gov/q/Pew-Seniors.

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3) DÍA! DIVERSITY IN ACTION

It’s April – time to celebrate El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children’s Day/Book Day). Día is a nationally recognized initiative that emphasizes the importance of literacy for all children from all backgrounds. It is a daily commitment to linking children and their families to diverse books, languages, and cultures. As part of the celebrations, the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of ALA, is offering numerous free Día resources to download including:

  • Webinars;
  • Press Kits;
  • Día Family Book Club Toolkit;
  • Posters;
  • Resource Guide.

Register your 2014 programs at the new Día website and you will help build a searchable database that will enable you to share your program information with other librarians and members of the public interested in learning more about Día programs happening around the country. Libraries that register will also receive Día stickers, buttons and bookmarks (while supplies last).

For more information on Día and to add your program to the database, visit dia.ala.org.

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4) CELEBRATE NATIONAL LIBRARY WEEK

Libraries and librarians have a powerful and positive impact on the lives of Americans on a daily basis. Their stories are key to communicating the value of libraries. National Library Week (April 13-19, 2014) is the perfect opportunity to encourage your community to tell the story of how the library has changed their lives. All participants will be entered into a grand-prize drawing for a Kindle Fire, so encourage your library lovers to start tweeting, snapping photos, and sharing their stories today by visiting sos.wa.gov/q/stories.

ALA’s Campaign for America’s Libraries has a variety of tools and ideas to help you promote the 2014 theme of “Lives change @ your library.” Promotional materials include a sample op-ed, proclamation, press release and scripts for use in radio ads. Visit ala.org/NLW.

National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April. It is a time to celebrate the contributions of our nation’s libraries and librarians and to promote library use.

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5) 2014 TEENS’ TOP TEN GIVEAWAY

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of ALA, is giving away 40 sets of the 2014 Teens’ Top Ten nominees to libraries in need. Qualified libraries can apply now through May 1 for a chance to win a set of the 2014 Teens’ Top Ten nominated titles. Individual library branches within a larger system are welcome to apply. For more information about the giveaway, and the Teens’ Top Ten, visit www.ala.org/yalsa/teenstopten.

The Teens’ Top Ten is a “teen choice” list, where teens nominate and choose their favorite books of the previous year. Nominators are members of teen book groups in 16 school and public libraries around the country. Nominations are posted on Celebrate Teen Literature Day, the Thursday of National Library Week, and teens across the country vote on their favorite titles each year. Readers age 12 to 18 will vote online between August and Teen Read Week in October.

This year, new teen book groups will be selected to be the nominators for future Teens’ Top Ten lists. The book groups will serve during the 2015-2016 term. For more information and to apply, visit the Teens’ Top Ten website using the link above.

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6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

Monday, April 14:

  • ProQuest Research Library – With so many publications, how do you find the right one to search? (ProQuest); 11:00 – 11:30 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/PQ1017;
  • Common Core and ProQuest Resources (ProQuest); 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/PQ1013;
  • eLibrary for Schools (ProQuest); 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/PQ1014;

Tuesday, April 15:

  • Introduction to the ProQuest Platform (ProQuest); 8:00 – 8:45 a.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/PQ1012;
  • Managing patron-initiated ILL requests in WorldCat Discovery (OCLC); 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/OCLC15Apr;
  • The Power of the PowerLink 4 Control Unit (AbleNet University); 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/ANU15Apr;
  • Bozarthzone! Truth About Social Learning (InSync Training); 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/BZ15Apr;
  • The Scoop on Series Nonfiction: What’s New for Spring 2014 (Booklist); 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/BL15Apr;
  • The New Volunteer Manager’s Toolkit (VolunteerMatch); 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/VM15Apr;
  • LGBTQ Book Buzz (Library Journal); 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/LGBTQBuzz;
  • Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – Part 1 of 2 (Texas State Library); 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/TSL15Apr;
  • ProQuest Research Library and K12 Central (ProQuest); 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/PQ1015;
  • SIRS Discoverer (ProQuest); 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/PQ1016;

Wednesday, April 16:

  • NCompass Live: Killing Dewey (NCompass Live); 8:00 – 9:00 a.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/NComp16Apr;
  • Becoming a Valued Player: A Toolkit for Personal and Professional Success (AMA); 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/AMA16Apr;
  • QIAT (Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology) Session 8: Professional Development and Training in AT (Assistive Technology) (AbleNet University); 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. PST: sos.wa.gov/q/QIAT8;
  • Effective Strategic Planning Part 2: Plan Development & Implementation (4Good); 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/4Good16Apr;
  • Andy Griffiths Book Talk (School Library Journal/Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group); 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/SLJAndy;
  • WorldShare Management Services Live Demonstration: Print Collections (OCLC); 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/OCLC16Apr;
  • From Baby to Preschooler: Early Childhood Health Resources (Infopeople); 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/Info16Apr;
  • Grantwriters as Strategic Leaders: Your Crucial Role (4Good); 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/4Good16AprPM;
  • Clinical Trials.gov (National Network of Libraries of Medicine, PNR, RML); 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/RML;

Thursday, April 17:

  • The Supercharged Management System (Heritage Preservation); 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/HPSuper;
  • Creating Interactive Videos from Really Boring Talking Heads, Lectures and Demo Videos (Training Magazine Network); 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/TMN17Apr;
  • Digital Natives vs. Digital Immigrants in the Classroom: What do Educators Need to Know? (AbleNet University); 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/ANU17Apr;
  • Playing by the Rules: Creating an Effective Volunteer Handbook (VolunteerMatch); 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/VM17Apr;
  • Ask the Expert: Everything You Wanted to Know about Nonprofit Tax Law (GuideStar); 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/taxlaw;
  • Who’s Using WorldShare ILL Now? Practical advice from real users (OCLC); 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. PDT: sos.wa.gov/q/OCLC17Apr;
  • Decision making: Crystal Ball or Magic 8 Ball? (Colorado State Library); 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. PDT: cslinsession.cvlsites.org.

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The Results are In!

Monday, January 23rd, 2012 Posted in Articles, For the Public, News | Comments Off on The Results are In!


2012 Caldecott Medal Winner

The ALA Midwinter conference has concluded and the winners for all of ALA’s major awards  have been released!

The Caldecott Medal is given to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for  children.  This year’s medal goes to A Ball for Daisy, written and illustrated by Chris Raschka

The Newbery Medal is given to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children This year’s award goes to Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos

The Belpre Medal is awarded annually to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth  This year’s medal goes to the author of Under the Mesquite,  Guadalupe Garcia McCall, and the illustrator of Diego Rivera: His World and Ours, Duncan Tonatiuh

The Odyssey Award is given annually to the producer of the best audiobook produced for children and/or young adults.  This year’s award goes to The True Meaning of Smekday, produced by Listening Library, an imprint of Random House Audio Publishing Group, written by Adam Rex, narrated by Bahni Turpin.

The Batchelder Award is a citation awarded to an American publisher for a children’s book considered to be the most outstanding of those books originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States, and subsequently translated into English and published in the United States.   This year’s award goes to Soldier Bear written by Bibi Dumon Tak, illustrated by Philip Hopman and translated by Laura Watkinson.

The Carnegie Medal honors the most outstanding video productions for children released during the previous year. This year’s award goes to Paul R. Gagne and Melissa Reilly Ellard of Weston Woods Studios, Inc., producers of “Children Make Terrible Pets.”

The Michael L. Printz Award is an award for a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature. This year’s Printz Award goes to Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley.

The Morris Award honors a debut book by a first-time author writing young adult literature.  This year’s Morris Award goes to Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley.

The Margaret A. Edwards Award honors  an author, as well as a specific body of hisor her work, for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature.  This year’s Edwards Award goes to Susan Cooper, author of The Dark Is Rising Sequence: Over Sea, Under Stone; The Dark Is Rising; Greenwitch; The Grey King;and Silver on the Tree.

The YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction honors the best nonfiction book published for young adults (ages 12-18) during a November 1 – October 31 publishing year. This year’s award goes to The Notorious Benedict Arnold: A True Story of Adventure, Heroism, & Treachery written by Steve Sheinkin.

The Association for Library Services to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA) annually administers the Caldecott, Newbery, Belpre, Sibert,  Wilder and Carnegie Medals as well as the Geisel, Odyssey  and Batchelder Award.  For more  information on these awards, including Honor Books and the committees that selected them,  please go to http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia.

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) a division of the American Library Association (ALA), annually administers awards for achievement in young adult literature, including the Printz Award, Morris Award,  Edwards Award, the Alex Awards and The YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction.   For more  information on these awards, including Honor Books and the committees that selected them,  please goto http://www.ala.org/yalsa/booklistsawards/bookawards

 

The Washington State Library congratulates all of the winners, Honor Books, finalists and nominees for each of these awards.  Please feel free to comment on these selections.  I know everyone here at WSL now has an expanded winter reading list.