WA Secretary of State Blogs

LIKE AS “TWO DROMIOS”: COMPLICATIONS FROM A CASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY.

September 18th, 2014 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, For Libraries, For the Public, Random News from the Newspapers on Microfilm Collection No Comments »

From the desk of Steve Willis, Central Library Services Program Manager of the Washington State Library:

[The following piece of found-at-random news comes from The Tacoma Daily Ledger, although the story took place in New Whatcom (a town which later became part of the City of Bellingham).

The tale reads like a screwball comedy. Published on November 9, 1897, the headline writer very appropriately made a reference to characters from Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors]:tacoma ledger

Mrs. Woods of Whatcom Secures a Divorce From Her Absent Spouse and Claims the Husband of Mrs. Lewis as Her Own — Row in the Lewis Family — Lewis Disappears — Woods Returns; Then Lewis, and Mystery Is Solved.

 NEW WHATCOM, Nov. 8.–(Special)–A most remarkable romance has been sequelized by the recent return to this city of James A. Woods, laden with treasure from Alaska. Mrs. James A. Woods has been residing in this city for the past five years while her husband was hunting gold in Alaska. She kept furnished rooms for rent.

One day last summer a Mr. Lewis and wife arrived in the city from Montana and proceeded to hunt furnished rooms. Mrs. Lewis finally rented one of Mrs. Woods’ rooms and the Lewis’ moved in. Like as Two

When Mrs. Woods was introduced to Mr. Lewis she at once convinced herself that he was Mr. Woods, her husband. She applied for and secured a divorce from Mr. Woods. Being fully convinced of Mr. Lewis’ real identity, Mrs. Woods imparted the information to Mrs. Lewis. Then there was a storm, a terrible upheaval of family quietude, and finally about three weeks ago Mr. Lewis disappeared and no trace of him could be discovered.

Last Friday James A. Woods arrived in the city, stating that he had landed at Victoria from Alaska October 28. The city police spotted him and placed him under surveillance; they had little doubt that the smooth-shaven Woods was none other than the bearded Lewis; besides, a peculiar scar upon Woods’ left thumb tallied with a similar mark on Lewis’ thumb. What was still more remarkable was the fact that Mrs. Lewis believed the new comer to be Mr. Lewis, while Mrs. Woods knew him as the real Woods.

Another search was made for Lewis and that gentleman reappeared upon the scene Saturday. Now it is all settled that Woods is really Woods of Alaska and Lewis is the real Lewis of Montana, though the remarkable resemblance of the two men to each other in all prominent features except whiskers fully explains and warrants the confusion.

[This newspapers and many others are available on microfilm and can be circulated to your local library on request]

 

 

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October 1st Event – Audio Archaeology at Madigan Army Hospital’s Radio Station

September 18th, 2014 WSL NW & Special Collections Posted in Articles, For the Public, News No Comments »

WSL Program ImageUpcoming Event at the Central Library!

Hidden Voices: Audio Archaeology at Madigan Army Hospital’s Radio Station, with Dale Sadler (Cultural Resources Specialist), and Duane Colt Denfeld (Architectural Historian), Joint Base Lewis-McChord Cultural Resources Program

Wednesday, October 1, 2014 @ 12:30 – 1:30 pm

Washington State Library, 2nd Floor

Point Plaza East, 6880 Capitol Blvd., Tumwater

(360) 704-5200

In this Washington State Archaeology Month presentation, Dale Sadler and Duane Colt Denfeld of Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) Cultural Resources Program will examine a fascinating part of Washington State’s history that was discovered during renovations in 2011 at Madigan Army Medical Center on JBLM in Pierce County. At that time thousands of phonograph records and other musical artifacts were found hidden behind a gymnasium wall.

Research identified them as recordings produced by the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS) from the World War II years through 1959. The recordings had been broadcast on the Madigan General Hospital (later Madigan Army Hospital) Bedside Network station, which used the call letters KMGH and later KMAH.

In their talk the speakers will focus on the sound artifacts (transcription discs and acetate recordings) and other related media objects (radio scripts, record sleeve annotations, etc.) that were uncovered in 2011. Some of these artifacts will be on display and the actual transcribed audio used to supplement the presentation. It will be a wonderful opportunity to literally hear the past.

This program is free to the public. You are welcome to bring lunch. Coffee will be served.

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Library Clippings September 12, 2014

September 15th, 2014 Staci Phillips Posted in For Libraries, For the Public, News, Updates No Comments »

 

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Library News

Little Free Libraries show novel charm. (The Seattle Times, Seattle, 09/09/14).

What schools can learn from Starbucks: The Internet is making single-purpose spaces like libraries less relevant. Why not replace them with spaces students will actually use? (Daily Journal of Commerce, Seattle, 08/28/14).

Council weighs in on Library: staff and councilmembers talk about intricacies of library issues. (Mercer Island Reporter, Mercer Island, 08/13/14).

Drugs are topic for upcoming forums. (Snohomish County Tribune, Snohomish, 08/06/14).

Carpenter Library turns 100: hopes to expand in the next century. (Daily Record, Ellensburg, 08/13/14).

Beat the summer brain drain: SCLD offers support to keep students skills fresh.
“The summer slide is when kids lose skills they learned in school because they just aren’t practicing them during the summer.” The panoply of resources the Spokane County Library District provides ensures that there is something for both school children and lifelong learners to use to help them beat the summer brain drain. (The Current, Liberty Lake, 08/00/14). Read the rest of this entry »

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Library Clippings September 5, 2014

September 9th, 2014 Staci Phillips Posted in For Libraries, For the Public, News, Updates 1 Comment »

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Library News
Wrapping up summer reading (Daily Record, Ellensburg, 08/06/14).

Toledo Library will officially open next week: August 13: Organizers hope volunteer effort pays off when doors open. (The Chronicle, Centralia, 08/05/14).

Library district seeks public input.
The Spokane County Library District will hold two meetings, starting today [July 22], to learn about people’s aspirations for and concerns about their community. (Spokesman Review, Spokane, 07/22/14).

Retrieving young readers: Therapy dog’s gentle presence encourages children to pick up book, read out loud at library. (The Columbian, Vancouver, 08/14/14).

Buildings

Third round of library pre-design meetings set (The Columbian, Vancouver, 08/15/14).

Public debates sites: beauty, practicality, costs discussed.
While residents and community organizations spoke out on where they want the new Silverdale Library, traffic and parking continued to be the main concerns during the Kitsap Regional Library’s board meeting Tuesday night. (The Kitsap Sun, Bremerton, 07/24/14).
Read the rest of this entry »

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Spotlight on Staff: Kathryn Devine

September 8th, 2014 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services No Comments »

Spotlight on Staff: Kathryn Devine

When you think of detectives you may think of the hardboiled Sam Spade or perhaps Sherlock Holmes with his deerstalker hat, but working behind the scenes at the Washington State Library is a detective extraordinaire — Kathryn Devine. KD-picKathryn is one of our Public Services Librarians and an expert at deep genealogical research. As her supervisor Crystal Lentz says, “Kathryn has solved many a genealogical mystery for us.” She has a BA in History from Marysville College in Tennessee, is a hair’s breadth away from a Master’s in Art History and of course a Masters in Library Science. In other words, Kathryn has had a lot of experience with research. When asked what she likes best about her job she answered that she loves to take on the deep research questions, something she can really sink her teeth into. She also mentioned the great team of people she works with at the State Library. She stressed how they all work so well together and willingly take on any task if they see that one of their co-workers is swamped.

Kathryn moved to Washington from Tennessee in 2003 working as a faculty librarian at Centralia Community College and as a reference librarian for Timberland Regional Library. She came to the State Library in 2006, hired as the Genealogy Librarian. If you’ve asked a Genealogy question in recent years you no doubt have experienced her excellent service.  Kathryn does outreach to Genealogy organizations in the state and will be presenting, along with the Washington State Archives, next week at the Eastside Genealogical Society in Bellevue.

Recently Kathryn’s job has morphed into helping field more of the Government and legal questions that our public services staff receive. She also helps to monitor the online chat service that the State library offers. It is not common knowledge but the Washington State Library’s “Ask A Librarian” service is the contact for the AccessWA Help Center, so we handle a lot of government research questions.

A personal project that Kathryn has taken on is working to make our Federal Collection more accessible to the public. She keeps her eyes open for short, non-copywrited federal material, which she then scans and makes available online through our catalog.

While she spends her days in quiet research her nights are anything but. She is married with an almost five year old daughter (and anyone with kids knows how busy THAT keeps you!) and… she skates in the Roller Derby!

Want to hear more about her awesomeness? Here are some quotes from her fans:

“I asked a question on Thursday night, 14-August via email, and received an answer Friday morning, 15-August @10am, @my msn.com inbox! Answer was exactly what I asked for – Thanks so much to Kathryn Devine Reference Librarian Washington State Library, for due diligence and very timely reply!! – Grateful Thanks…”

“Hats off to Ms. Kathryn Devine. Questions answered succinctly and with sufficient information to follow up. You Guys ROCK!”

“I didn’t realize at the last minute that this was for the library instead of the Revenue’s contact us page. Kathryn went ahead and helped me anyway, so she’s awesome!”

So if you need help with a good meaty research question, particularly about Washington State history, contact us. You will make Kathryn’s day and you will no doubt become another true fan.

 

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50 years of preserving and exploring in the North Cascades of Washington.

September 5th, 2014 WSL NW & Special Collections Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public, Washington Reads 1 Comment »

Mount_Shuksan_tarnA small selection of resources tracing 50 years of preserving and exploring in the North Cascades of Washington.

On September 3, 1964 President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the wilderness act as a result of pressure from national and state level citizens and organizations who shared similar concerns about the protection of the United States uninhabited environments amidst increasing industrialization and population growth.  Four years following that act, the North Cascades National Park was created.  The State Library maintains copies of the hearings that led to its creation within its Federal Publication Collection,

The North Cascades. Hearings, Ninetieth Congress, second session (Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1968. 3 vols. 985 p. Illustrations, maps.) These hearings held April 19-Sept. 4, 1968 in various cities.

 “Serial no. 90-24.”

Y 4.In 8/14:90-8970/ pt.1 thru 3 (call ahead to have these volumes pulled for on-site review)

“H.R. 8970 and related bills, a bill to establish the North Cascades National Park and Ross Lake national recreation area, to designate the Pasayten Wilderness and to modify the Glacier Peak Wilderness in the State of Washington, and for other purposes.”

A less-traveled jewel of Washington’s wilderness regions and one of the nation’s least visited attractions, North Cascades National Park is arguably the crown jewel, the largest block of protected wilderness along the U.S. – Canadian border.  It is largely a roadless area, though it is accessible via the North Cascades highway (WA-20), which commenced prior to Johnson’s administration with appropriated funds in 1958 and completed with a final connection to State Route 153 in 1972.

Washington Highways: North Cascades Highway Dedication Issue. (Olympia, Wash.: Washington State Dept. of Highways, 1964-1972.

WA 388 H531ne 1964 copy three available for checkout

 But don’t be dissuaded by the relative scarcity of roads, there are plenty of road trips for the automotive enthusiast that exploit the natural beauty and opportunities for RV and tent camping that do not require a large-scaling hiking adventure!

The North Cascades Highway: A Roadside Guide to America’s Alps. By Jack McLeod. (Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 2013. 104 pp. Color illustrations, maps, bibliographical references and index.)

NW 917.975 MCLEOD 2013

 Camping Washington: The Best Public Campground for Tents & RVs, Rated & Reviewed. By Ron C. Judd. (Seattle, Wash.: Mountaineers Books, c2009. 325 pp. Illustrations, maps.)

NW 917.9706 JUDD 2009

Even the casual appreciator finds themselves knocked back by the North Cascades raw beauty.  From top to bottom it’s a stunner: steep peaks beset with translucent blue glaciers that melt into dramatic waterfalls streaming into alpine meadows and deep and lovely lakes cannot help but wow.  Such untrammeled gorgeousness has led many to dub it the Alps of North America, but it is its own wonderful vision.  A vision so singular that it held members of the Beat Generation in thrall

Poets on the Peaks: Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen & Jack Kerouac in the North Cascades. Text and Photographs by John Suiter. (Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, c2002. 340 pp. Illustrations, bibliographical references and index.)

NW 811.54 SUITER 2002                  AVAILABLE

If you cannot visit soon but wish to get a glimpse, you can see its beauty captured in photographs by checking out

Lake Chelan and the North Cascades: A Pictorial Tour. Text and photos by Mike and Nancy Barnhart; edited by Ana Maria Spagna. (Stehekin, WA: Bridge Creek Pub., c2000. 52 pp. Illustrations, maps.)

NW 917.977 BARNHAR 2000

Shortly after the park’s creation, local author Frank Darvill and the Mountaineers of Washington State each created a collection of maps and routes to aide interested hikers

A Pocket Guide to Selected Trails of the North Cascades National Park and Associated Recreational Complex. By Fred T. Darvill, Jr. (Mount Vernon, Wash. (P.O. Box 636, 98273): F.T.Darvill, c1968.)  52 pp.: illustrations, map.)

NW 917.9773 DARVILL 1968

Hiker’s Map of the North Cascades; Routes and Rocks in the Mt. Challenger Quadrangle. By Rowland W. Tabor and Dwight Farnsworth Crowder. Drawings by Ed Hanson.(Seattle, The Mountaineers 1968. 47 p. Illustrations, maps, bibliographic references.)

R 917.9724 TABOR 1968 (Library Use Only)

Since then there have been additional works created to guide those who wish to wander through the northern woods.  The Mountaineers’ guide has added many more hikes of varying difficulty and length since that early guide

100 Hikes in Washington’s North Cascades National Park Region. (Seattle, WA: Mountaineers, c2000-

NW 917.9773 ONE HUN 2000

You can spend just a single day hiking.  If you are interested in doing so, try consulting

Day Hike! North Cascades, 3rd Edition: The Best Trails You Can Hike in a Day. By Mike McQuaide (Seattle, Wash: Sasquatch Books 2014. 240 pp.)

NW 796.5109 MCQUAID 2014

Longtime Puget Sound area residents may remember Television personality Don McCune (who also played children’s show host “Captain Puget”) hosted a series called “Exploration Northwest.” In that series he hosted a three episode special split into 30-minute-segments on the North Cascades.  Well, as luck would have it, the State Library has those available for your viewing pleasure as well:

North Cascades [videorecording] / KOMO TV. (Woodinville, WA: Don McCune Library, c2005.

1 videodisc (90 min.): sd., col. with b&w sequences; 4 3/4 in.

NW DVD 979.773 NORTH C 2005

In the first segment, the history of the four-year construction of the north cross-state highway is documented. The second segment presents the story of injured eagles care of wounded eagles and their eventual return to their native Skagit Valley habitat. In the third segment, climbers scale pinnacles in the North Cascades and demonstrate free-climbing skills.

There is wildlife galore to encounter in the North Cascades.  Bird lovers will discover tons of bird watching opportunities,

Birds of the Northwestern National Parks: A Birder’s Perspective. By Roland H. Wauer; drawings by Mimi Hoppe Wolf. (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000. 137 pp. Illustrations.)

NW 598.0723 WAUER 2000

And all sorts of mammals ranging from elk, wolves and wolverines to the always controversial Grizzly Bear presence can be sighted.  In fact the North Cascades are one of the few areas in Washington State where the Grizzly, while listed as endangered in this state, can still be encountered.  Be observant and – as always – take care, especially if you are going fishing in the late summer or autumn.

Wolves in the Land of Salmon. By David Moskowitz. (Portland, OR: Timber Press, c2013. 334 pp. Illustrations, maps, bibliographical references and index.)

NW 599.773 MOSKOWI 2013

North Cascade (Nooksack) Elk Herd. Prepared by Michael A. Davison. (Olympia, WA: Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Program, [2002] 53 pp. Illustrations, maps, bibliographical references.)

WA 639.2 F62nor c2 2002 c.2         AVAILABLE

Click on the following to:

View online from Washington State Library as a PDF Document – Adobe Acrobat Reader Required

http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/Record/ViewMedia/542A3D7A97762AE702EB8673A66FEB2A?_ga=1.46557220.2028710183.1406221241

A Preliminary Study of Historic and Recent Reports of Grizzly Bears, Ursus Arctos, in the North Cascades Area of Washington.  By Paul T. Sullivan. (Olympia, Wash.: Washington Dept. of Game, [1983]

WA 799 G141pre s1 1983 c.1

North Cascades Grizzly Bear Ecosystem Evaluation: Final Report. By Jon A. Almack, William L. Gaines, Robert H. Naney … [et al.] (Denver, Colo.: Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee, 1993.

Washington State Docs WA 799 W64nor c2 1993

Grizzly Wars: The Public Fight over the Great Bear. By David Knibb; foreword by Lance Craighead. (Spokane: Eastern Washington University Press, c2008. 284 pp. Illustrations, maps, bibliographical references, and index.)

NW 333.9597 KNIBB 2008

There are pieces of history tucked away in the park as well, for the curious historians and archaeology buffs:

Historic Structures Inventory: North Cascades National Park Service Complex. Compiled by Gretchen A. Luxenberg. (Seattle, Wash.: Cultural Resources Division, Pacific Northwest Region, National Park Service, [1984]  108pp. Illustrations, maps, forms, bibliographical references, and index.)

Goat Lake Trail: A Hike into Mining History.” By Richard C. McCollum. (Seattle, Wash.: Northwest Press, [1981], 2 pp. Illustrations, maps, bibliographical references.) As part of the journal, Northwest discovery; v. 2, no. 5. pp. 270-330

NW 979.5 NORTHWE 1981 May

Not only is history to found in the park but it has been made there, particularly in the field of fire control:

Spittin’ in the Wind. Bk. 1, History & Tales: North Cascades Smokejumper Base: The Birthplace Of Smokejumping, 1939-2007. By Bill Moody and Larry Longley. (2007. 256 pp. Illustrations)

NW 634.9618 SPITTIN 2007

As with so many natural spaces, tense debates regarding best practices on how to maintain the lands, and how to best balance human interactions with the environment with the needs of the environment as a whole, persist.

Wilderness Alps: Conservation and Conflict in Washington’s North Cascades. By Harvey Manning with the North Cascades Conservation Council; edited by Ken Wilcox; foreword by David R. Brower. (Bellingham, Wash.: Northwest Wild Books, 2007. 479 pp. Illustrations, bibliographical references, and index.)

NW 979.773 MANNING 2007

We invite you to join us in celebrating this Washington treasure.  Please consider taking a road trip into this marvelous region of our state, and maybe as you’re planning a trip you’ll feel like picking up some resources at your State or local library along the way.

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WSL Updates for September 4, 2014

September 4th, 2014 Diane Hutchins Posted in For Libraries, For the Public, Grants and Funding, News, Technology and Resources, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

Volume 10, September 4, 2014 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) FIRST TUESDAYS – READERSFIRST INITIATIVE

2) NEW VIDEO INTRODUCES WASHINGTON STATE LIBRARY

3) LIBRARY COUNCIL OF WASHINGTON SEEKS NEW MEMBERS

4) CATCH THE EARLY BIRD – REGISTER NOW FOR WALE 2014

5) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

Read the rest of this entry »

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Clippings August 29, 2014

September 2nd, 2014 Staci Phillips Posted in For Libraries, For the Public, News, Updates No Comments »

 

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Library News
Mill A unveils Little Free Library
The Columbia Gorge community of Mill A is now one of many that boasts a Little Free Library. It joins more than 15,000 Little Free Libraries across all 50 states and in 40 countries in the world. Funds to support the project were raised through a club sponsored plant and bake sale. (The Skamania County Pioneer, Stevenson, 07/23/14).

Library planning ‘The Great Checkout’ during move.
In anticipation of the Ferndale Library’s upcoming move to its new building, staff plan to hold a “Great Checkout” event. The idea is for patrons to “help” with the move by checking out materials at the current location and returning them to the new location. (Ferndale Record, Ferndale, 07/30/14).

Parking the bookmobile: Library on wheels wraps up for the summer. (Daily Record, Ellensburg, 07/31/14).

Forum on Sky Valley drug use coming to library. (Monroe Monitor & Valley News, Monroe, 07/29/14).

Leave a book, take a book at Kennydale Book Exchange. (Renton Reporter, Renton, 08/01/14).
Read the rest of this entry »

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Clippings August 22, 2014

August 25th, 2014 Staci Phillips Posted in For Libraries, For the Public, News, Updates No Comments »

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Library News
Libraries vote in Stanwood?: a ballot measure to annex the city’s library into Sno-Isle likely.
(The Herald, Everett, 06/25/14). http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20140629/NEWS01/140629166

Library levy issue divides council. (The North Coast News, Ocean Shores, 07/17/14).
Mayor breaks tie on library levy ballot issue | North Coast News

BG man sentenced to one year in jail for starting fires in BG library: Love also wrote bomb threat on a bathroom wall at BGHS. (Reflector, Battle Ground, 07/16/14). http://www.thereflector.com/news/article_e02314be-0c69-11e4-bbe2-0019bb2963f4.html

Winlock residents to vote on annexation into Timberland Regional Library system: November ballot: county commissioners approve ballot measure for Winlock voters to decide on whether to keep contract or annex. (The Chronicle, Centralia, 07/22/14). http://www.chronline.com/news/article_0ce52f2a-11c7-11e4-ad6b-001a4bcf887a.html Read the rest of this entry »

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Washington State Library providing timely and professional service in a virtual world

August 22nd, 2014 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public No Comments »

As the Washington State Library adjusts to recent budget reductions which required a reduction in hours open to the public, we continue to provide excellent service.  As a 21st century library, we  provide service to information seekers using tools of the online world such as talking with a reference librarian through chat. Questions come into our Washington State Library specific “Ask a Librarian” page via email or live online chat every day and our reference librarians are cracker jacks at finding just the information you seek. These questions range in scope from government research to interesting stories found in newspapers. In the most recent quarter 261 questions were answered via live chat and 1178 via email. ask a librarianEach of these patrons received their answer from a distance, without ever leaving their home or workplace.

Here are just a few of the comments received from our happy customers.

 I received the documents I requested via email in less than 1 hour. I couldn’t ask for better service.

 I love communicating by e-mail and appreciate your fast service. 

 I love this site. I have not needed to use it often but have always gotten the information I asked for. It’s fast, easy & the librarians are always knowledgeable & polite. Love, love, love it! 

 I was extremely pleased with the quick, professional response, and the spot-on answer to my question. Thanks to Mary Schaff and everyone else responsible for this important service.

 THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! You’ve been a tremendous help, and I can’t thank you enough. Quick and courteous help. Thank you so much!

 I thank you so much for your timely and professional help with my search your service is valuable and appreciated Thank you.

 The Washington State Library is always exceptionally helpful and responsive.

 Do you work for a government agency? We would love to expand this service to additional governmental and quasi-governmental agencies. If you are interested in placing an Ask a Librarian chat widget on your website (just like the picture)  contact Crystal Lentz at crystal.lentz@sos.wa.gov.

As part of the Help Center we also provide assistance to individuals using Access Washington who need assistance.

Feeling frustrated?  Google isn’t giving you the information you need? Remember, just Ask a Librarian.

 

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