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Lights, Signals, Buoys, and Daymarks — Our Rich Heritage

Monday, April 10th, 2017 Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public | Comments Off on Lights, Signals, Buoys, and Daymarks — Our Rich Heritage


The meagre lighthouse all in white, haunting the seaboard, as if it were the ghost of an edifice that had once had colour and rotundity, dripped melancholy tears after its late buffeting by the waves. ~Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

A lighthouse is … Although we often think of a tower with a bright light at the top, located on an important or dangerous waterway, lighthouses are quite varied in architecture. They had, and still have, two main purposes — to serve as navigational aids and to warn ships of dangerous areas.

Historical record tell us that one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, Pharos located in Alexandria, Egypt, was the first lighthouse recorded in history, built around 280 BC and as tall as a 45-story building. An open fire at the top of the tower was the source of light.

(“Lighthouses: FAQ.” Fact Monster from Information Please, Sandbox Networks, Inc., Publishing as Fact Monster, www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0800631.html. Accessed 24 Mar. 2017.)

Following Independence from England, the newly formed U.S. Congress created the Lighthouse Establishment as an administrative unit of the federal government on 7 August 1789.

Benjamin Franklin, a United States founding father, is sometimes attributed with having said, “Lighthouses are more useful than churches.”

What Franklin actually wrote to his wife after narrowly escaping a shipwreck was, “The bell ringing for church, we went thither immediately, and with hearts full of gratitude, returned sincere thanks to God for the mercies we had received: were I a Roman Catholic, perhaps I should on this occasion vow to build a chapel to some saint, but as I am not, if I were to vow at all, it should be to build a light-house.

(“A Quote from Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin.” Goodreads, Inc. Accessed 27 Mar. 2017.)

Not all safety/navigational lights are in lighthouses. There are signals, buoys, daymarks and light ships as well.

My own fascination with lighthouses began when as a child our family took short trips to the middle and southern Oregon coasts. We visited lighthouses on the Coquille River in Bandon; Umpqua River in Reedsport; and later, as an adult I explored the Yaquina Bay lighthouse in Newport.

So, recently when grubbing about among the State Library’s shelves of historic federal publications and coming across Light List Pacific Coast, United States, 1933 I naturally began leafing through the Oregon and Washington sections to see how many lighthouses I recognized.

(Light list including lights, fog signals, buoys, and daymarks. Pacific coast, United States, Canada, Hawaiian, and Samoan Islands / U.S. Department of Commerce, Lighthouse Service. Washington : U.S. G.P.O., 1933. Print: C 9.19:1933)

A short history

“The Aids to Navigation mission of the U. S. Coast Guard has a history dating back to the building and illumination of the first American lighthouse on Little Brewster Island in Boston Harbor in 1716. At first, because of the indifference of England, local or colonial governments had to shoulder the responsibility of making the waters safe for mariners.” Hence, the founding of the Lighthouse Establishment created by the U.S. Congress of the United States in 1789. Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury, was its first administrator.

(Strobridge, Truman R. “Chronology of Aids to Navigation.” Historic Light Stations, United State Coast Guard, 21 Dec. 2016, www.uscg.mil/history/articles/h_USLHSchron.asp. Accessed 6 Mar. 2017.)

The first federal agency formally charged with responsibility for lighthouses was the Treasury Department.

  • In 1852 Congress established the Lighthouse Board. The Lighthouse Board was responsible for issuing the List of lights and fog signals of the United States and the Dominion of Canada on the Pacific coast of North America, and of the United States on the Hawaiian, Midway, Guam, and Samoan Islands (titles vary)
  • In 1903 the Lighthouse Board was transferred to the newly created Department of Commerce and Labor where in June 1910 the Lighthouse Board was succeeded by the Bureau of Lighthouses.
  • In 1939 the Bureau’s functions were transferred to the Coast Guard, a part of the Treasury Department, and now part of Homeland Security.

With each organizational shift the Light List continued to be published.

Currently, the Light List is published in 7 volumes each reflecting one of seven regions. The Pacific and Pacific Islands volume includes the eleventh (California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona), thirteenth (Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana), fourteenth (Hawaii), and seventeenth (Alaska) districts. It contains a lists of lights, sound signals, buoys, day beacons, and other aids to navigation. As it has been from the beginning of The Light List, it is published by the Government Publishing Office, the official publisher of the federal government. Learn more.

Light List is available online: Pacific Coast and Pacific Islands. Contemporary issues may be available either in print or microfiche and since 2002 they have been distributed to federal depository libraries (like us) only in microfiche. Check with the State Library’s public services staff if you need assistance.

Washington Lighthouses

Man in cape with a disappointed look on his face

“Cape” Disappointment

There are eighteen active lighthouses in the state, one of which serves as a museum. In addition, three are standing but inactive (one of these is now a museum), three were supplanted by automated towers, and two have been completely demolished. The Cape Disappointment Light was the first lighthouse in the state (lit in 1856) and is still active. It sits where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean following its 1,243 mile journey.

(“List of Lighthouses in Washington.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lighthouses_in_Washington. Accessed 23 Mar. 2017.)

Click on a Washington lighthouse name for information about it

Admiralty Head Alki Point Browns Point
Burrows Island Bush Point Cape Disappointment
Cape Flattery Cattle Point Destruction Island
Dofflemeyer Point Ediz Hook Gig Harbor
Grays Harbor (Westport) Lightship Swiftsure LV 83/WAL 513 Lime Kiln
Marrowstone Point Mukilteo New Dungeness
North Head Patos Island Point No Point
Point Robinson Point Wilson Skunk Bay
Slip Point Turn Point West Point
(The Lighthouses, Lighthouse Friends, Inc., lighthousefriends.com/pull-lights.asp. Accessed 27 Mar. 2017. Arranged by state.)

A list of Washington State lighthouses can also be found at “Historic Light Station Information & Photography.” on the U.S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office web site.

The history includes both active and deactivated lighthouses. Some entries point to photographs.

Washington Rural Heritage

The Washington State Library’s Washington Rural Heritage is a collaborative project that facilitates sharing of local history materials from libraries, museums, and private collections of citizens across Washington State. To date one hundred twenty-nine cultural institutions have participated in the project.

The Orcas Island Heritage Collection was a collaboration of the Orcas Island Public Library  Orcas Island Historical Museum. One of the interesting stories in the collection is about the Pole Pass Light. Search the collection and you will find 19 entries.

Pole Pass Light

Map showing location of Pole Pass, Washington

Courtesy LighthouseFriends.com

“Pole Pass, is a narrow rocky pass in Deer Harbor between Orcas and Crane islands. In the late 1800s and early 1900s steamboats hired someone to hold a light if they had to go through at night. Finally about 1940 a permanent light was constructed.”

(Geoghegan, James T. “Pole Pass Light.” Orcas Island Heritage, Washington State Library, 11 June 1914, http://bit.ly/2nGKT2C. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017. )
 “In 1883  the captain of the mail boat S.S. LIBBY asked William Cadwell, a Pole Pass homesteader, to suspend a lantern at the pass to guide the steamer during its evening runs. In exchange for this service, the vessel provided William’s family with free transportation and shipment of produce grown on the Cadwell farm. In 1887 the federal government placed a larger lantern containing a red globe at the site. William manually lit this lantern every night which was fueled by kerosene to ensure the flame wouldn’t be extinguished during bad weather. After Cadwell’s death around 1890, son-in-law Robert McLachlan took over the role of light keeper. Then McLachlan’s son. Kirk, continued the lamp-lighting tradition by supervising the beacon from 1907 to 1949. At that point the U.S, Coast Guard replaced Orcas Island’s only navigational light with a blinker- which continues to operate today.”
(“History Corner [Newspaper Column].” Orcas Islander, bit.ly/2mR5Rb9 Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.)
Steamboat passing through Pole Pass between Orcas and Crane Islands, Washington.

Pole Pass (Washington) 1909. Photograph by J. A. McCormick [Public domain], via Wikimedia Common

 

Pole Pass Light

Pole Pass Light. Geoghegan, James T., 1869-1953, Orcas Island Heritage — James T. Geoghegan Collection

Pole Pass light show in vintage postcards

Pole Pass Light. Used by permission, Cherie Christensen, Saltwater People Historical Society.

“Watching the blinkers on a dark night brings back many memories to the old settlers still living near Pole pass. They recall shipwrecks in the old days and have a warm place in their hearts at the thoughtfulness of the lightkeepers through the years. They are glad, too, for the progress that brings new lights as they are needed.”

(McLachlan, Edith. “1883 ❖ POLE PASS LIGHT ❖.” Saltwater People Log, Saltwater People Historical Society, http://bit.ly/2o13aEf. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017. Original source: They Named it Deer Harbor, McLachlan, Edith. 1970.)

Irene Barfoot O’Neill, daughter of the light keeper on Obstruction Island provides insight into life in a lighthouse:

“All of these lights were fueled by kerosene (coal oil). If the flame was not carefully adjusted, the chimney would be smoked and the light not seen clearly, thus endangering the lives of those traveling on the boats which depended upon the light being visible for the required distance.

The lamp itself was much the same as an ordinary household lamp and chimney, but the outer glass protection globe was thick because of the magnification in the manufacturing process. As I remember, the round globes were about 10″ high by 8″ in diameter. The oil tank held enough to last seven days, requiring a trip once a week to refill the tank and clean the lamps. If a storm seemed imminent, father wouldn’t wait, especially in winter.

The only weather forecasting was done by reading the sky and cloud formations. Of course, the wind and tides were a consideration, as the only power was by oars or perhaps a sail …

The pay for this work wasn’t generous, but many times the $13.00 per month pay was our only cash income.

One of the highlights of our year was the semiannual visit of the lighthouse tender “Heather”, which brought oil, towels, extra chimneys, and other supplies which were stored on an 8′ by 8′ white-painted “oil house” near the beach. Oil came in wooden cases, with two five-gallon tins in each. When empty, these sturdy boxes and tins served many uses around the farm. With the top cut off and the sharp edges neatly hammered down, two of these tins sat of the back of our wood stove as a supply of hot water for dishes or whatever.”

(O’Neill, Irene Barfoot. 125 Years Olga: Memories and Potlucks: Orcas Island Heritage, Washington State Library, 10 June 2008, Washington Rural Heritage Orcas Collection. Accessed 24 Mar. 2017.)

Washington State Parks

Some lighthouses have become the property of and are managed by Washington State Parks:

Exploring Coastal Guardians at State Parks

In honor of National Lighthouse Day, August 7, 2016, Washington State Parks posted an article to their blog:

Exploring Coastal Guardians at State Parks | Adventure Awaits, WA, Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, http://www.adventureawaits.com/201/Exploring-Coastal-Guardians-8-5-16. Accessed 12 Apr. 2017.
Photo of lobby, North Head Lighthouse in Ilwaco, Washington

Interior Lobby, North Head Lighthouse, Ilwaco, Washington

From our state agency documents collection

The Washington State Library is the depository of state agency publications published in many different formats. Publications from 1889 onward provide current and historical information about State government.  They are a resource for research into Washington’s past and they are a cornerstone for Washington’s future. The State Library also maintains a system of depository libraries geographically spread across the state.

McCroskey, Lauren. Washington State Parks Historic Properties Condition Assessment Phase Ii: Eastern Region. Olympia, Wash.: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, 2000. Print: WA 719.3 P231was s23 2000.

Conconully State Park; Dalles Mountain Ranch, Horsethief Lake State Park;  Northrup Canyon, Steamboat Rock State Park; Ohme Gardens State Park; Olmstead Place Park; Fort Simcoe State Park; Riverside State Park.

McCroskey, Lauren. Washington State Parks Historic Properties Condition Assessment Phase Ii: Northwest Region. Olympia, Wash.: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, 2000. Print: WA 719.3 P231was s22 2000.

Burrows Island lighthouse; Fort Casey State Park; Cowan Ranch, Hoko River State Park; Fort Flagler State Park; Lime Kiln Point State Park; Old Fort Townsend State Park; Patos Island lighthouse; Point Wilson lighthouse, Fort Worden State Park; O’Brien-Riggs property, Rockport State Park; Rothschild house. Burrows Island lighthouse; Fort Casey State Park; Cowan Ranch, Hoko River State Park; Fort Flagler State Park; Lime Kiln Point State Park; Old Fort Townsend State Park; Patos Island lighthouse; Point Wilson lighthouse, Fort Worden State Park; O’Brien-Riggs property, Rockport State Park; Rothschild house.

McCroskey, Lauren. Washington State Parks Historic Properties Condition Assessment Phase Ii: Southwest Region. Olympia, Wash.: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, 2000. Print: WA 719.3 P231was s28 2000.

Battleground Lake State Park; Fort Canby State Park; Fort Columbia State Park; Grays Harbor State Park; Pe Ell Section House; Siminiski House; Rainbow Falls State Park.

McCroskey, Lauren. Washington State Parks Historic Properties Condition Assessment Phase Ii: Technical Specifications & Technical Drawings. Olympia, Wash.: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, 2000. Print: WA 719.3 P231was s24 2000.

North Head Lighthouse: Established 1898. Olympia, WA: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, 2000. Print: WA 719.3 P231nor h 2012.

Photo of the Mukilteo Lighthouse

Mukilteo Lighthouse by “Jon Zander(Digon3)” courtesy Wikimedia Commons

From our Northwest collection – a sampling of publications on lighthouses

The State Library preserves and provides access to a comprehensive collection of information on the geographic area we now know as Washington State and the other identified regions of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon, Idaho, and Western Montana. The collection also contains works on Alaska, British Columbia and the Yukon Territory to reflect our shared histories.

Aliberti, Ray. Lighthouses Northwest: The Designs of Carl Leick. Coupeville, Wa. (P.O. Box 827, Coupeville 98239-0827): Aliberti, 2000. Print: NW 387.155 ALIBERT 2000; Historic Research and Rare Collection copies available for in-library use only.

Bache, Hartman. Early West Coast Lighthouses: Eight Drawings and Paintings. San Francisco: Book Club of California, 1964. Print: Historic Research and Rare Collection copies for in library use only.

Ehlers, Chad, and Jim Gibbs. Sentinels of Solitude: West Coast Lighthouses. San Luis Obispo, CA: EZ Nature Books, 1989. Print: R 387.155 EHLERS 1981, in-library use only.

Groth, Karen N. Westport’s Masterpiece: Building the Grays Harbor Lighthouse, 1897-98. Portland, Or: Nicholson Press, 2010. Print: NW 387.155 GROTH 2010; Historic Research copy available for in-library use only.

Hanable, William S. Lighthouses and Lifesaving on Washington’s Outer Coast: 15 Historic Postcards. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Pub, 2009. Print: NW 387.155 HANABLE 2009; Historic Research copy available for in-library use only.

Leffingwell, Randy, and Pamela Welty. Lighthouses of the Pacific Coast: Your Guide to the Lighthouses of California, Oregon, and Washington. Minneapolis: Voyageur Press, 2010. Print: NW 387.155 LEFFING 2000; Historic Research copy available for in-library use only.

Lighthouses of the Northwest. Howes Cave, N.Y: Hartnett House Map Publishers, 2005. Print: NW 387.155 HARTNET 2000; Historic Research copy available for in-library use only.

Lucero, Donella J, and Nancy L. Hobbs. Guardian of the Columbia River: Cape Disappointment Lighthouse, 1856-2006. Long Beach, Wash.?: Willapa Communications, 2006. Print: NW 387.155 LUCERO 2006; Historic Research copy available for in-library use only.

Lucero, Donella J, and Nancy L. Hobbs. North Head Lighthouse. Long Beach, Wash.?: Willapa Communications, 2006. Print: NW 387.155 LUCERO 2006; Historic Research copy available for in-library use only.

McCurdy, James G. Cape Flattery and Its Light: Life on Tatoosh Island. Seattle: Shorey Book Store, 1966. Print: R OVERSIZ 387.155 MCCURDY 1966 in-library use only.

McDaniel, Nancy L. A Sound Defense: Military Sites, Lighthouses, and Memorials of Puget Sound. Chimacum, Wash: Nancy L. McDaniel, 2013. Print: NW 917.9704 MCDANIE 2013; Historic Research copy available for in-library use only.

Nelson, Sharlene P. Umbrella Guide to Washington Lighthouses. Friday Harbor, WA (PO Box 1460, Friday Harbor 98250-1460): Umbrella Books, 1990. Print: NW 387.155 NELSON 1990; Historic Research copy available for in-library use only.

Roberts, Bruce, and Ray Jones. Lighthouses of Washington: A Guidebook and Keepsake. Guilford, Conn: Insiders’ Guide, 2006. Print: NW 387.155 ROBERTS 2006

Roberts, Bruce, and Ray Jones. Pacific Northwest Lighthouses: Oregon to the Aleutians. Old Saybrook, Conn: Globe Pequot Press, 1997. Print: NW 387.155 ROBERTS 1997; In-library use only copy also available.

Survey Correspondence, Washington Territory: Records of the Bureau of Land Management. Washington? D.C.: The Bureau?, 1980. Microfilm: NW MICRO 333.16 SURVEY 188-?, 2 reels, for in-library use only.

Washington Lighthouses: Photographic Essay. Tacoma, WA: Smith-Western Co, 2000. Print: R 387.155 WASHING 200-?, in-library use only.

“Washington Secretary of State – Legacy Washington – Washington History: Historical Maps Detail.” Washington Secretary of State – Legacy Washington – Washington History: Historical Maps Detail, U.S. Corp of Engineers, 1881, www.sos.wa.gov/legacy/maps/maps_detail.aspx?m=22. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

In print: Symons, T. W. (Thomas William), 1849-1920. [Washington, D.C. : Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army], 1881. In library use only. Request ahead of time.

Symons, T. W. (Thomas William), 1849-1920. [Washington, D.C.] : Office of the Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army, 1885. In library use only. Request ahead of time.

Other Resources

Society, Saltwater People Historical. “Saltwater People Log, Saltwater People Historical Society, 6 Nov. 2013, http://bit.ly/2n4v1UE. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

Strobridge, Truman R. “CHRONOLOGY OF AIDS TO NAVIGATION.” Historic Light Stations, United State Coast Guard, 21 Dec. 2016, www.uscg.mil/history/articles/h_USLHSchron.asp. Accessed 6 Mar. 2017. Excellent chronology and list of resources.

 “Lighthouses: FAQ.” Fact Monster from Information Please, Sandbox Networks, Inc., Publishing as Fact Monster., www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0800631.html. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

“List of Lighthouses in Washington.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 20 Mar. 2017, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lighthouses_in_Washington. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

“Historic Light Station Information & Photography.” Coast Guard Lighthouses, U.S. Coast Guard, www.uscg.mil/history/weblighthouses/LHWA.asp. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

Thiesen, William H. “Coast Guard Lighthouses and the History of the ‘Flying Santa.” The Retiree Newsletter, pp. 9–10, www.uscg.mil/hr/psc/retnews/2017/January17newsletter.pdf. Accessed 3 Apr. 2017.

 “U. S. Coast Guard Monuments & Memorials .” Coast Guard Monuments & Memorials, US Coast Guard, www.uscg.mil/history/faqs/uscgmemorials.asp. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

 “Washington Secretary of State – Legacy Washington – Washington History: Historical Maps Detail.” Washington Secretary of State – Legacy Washington – Washington History: Historical Maps Detail, U.S. Corp of Engineers, 1881, www.sos.wa.gov/legacy/maps/maps_detail.aspx?m=22. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

Just for Fun

How to purchase a lighthouse: “Coast Guard History.” USCG: Frequently Asked Questions, U.S. Coast Guard, Historian’s Office, www.uscg.mil/history/faqs/Lighthouse_Keepers.asp. Accessed 22 Mar. 2017.

How to become a lighthouse keeper: “Coast Guard History.” USCG: Frequently Asked Questions, U.S. Coast Guard, Historian’s Office, www.uscg.mil/history/faqs/Lighthouse_Keepers.asp. Accessed 22 Mar. 2017.

“Stay at a Washington Lighthouse.” Stay at a Washington Lighthouse, United States Lighthouse Society, www.stayatawashingtonlighthouse.org/. Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

Need assistance finding state or federal publications? Contact our Ask a Librarian service.

The following State Library staff contributed to this article: Sean Lanksbury, Pacific Northwest and Special Collections Librarian, Evan Robb, Digital Repository Librarian; Nikki Chiampa, Digital Projects Librarian.

Access to Historic Congressional Information

Tuesday, March 7th, 2017 Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public | Comments Off on Access to Historic Congressional Information


Photo of a puzzled emoticon (smiley face)

Courtesy Wikimedia commons

Remember these?

  • The Administrations of Presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Jimmy Carter
  • Passage/ratification of the 26th Amendment (allowing 18-year-olds to vote)
  • Watergate
  • The end of the Vietnam War
  • The US Bicentennial
  • Civil Service Reform Act of 1978
  • The Iran Hostage Crisis
  • OPEC and the Oil Crises of the 1970s
  • Title IX Amendment of the Higher Education Act

The 1970’s. Ugh! High gas prices, low mpg, and 55 mph speed limits! So what was going in Congress?

The U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) just announced that in partnership with the Library of Congress the have released the digital version of the bound Congressional Record from 1971-1980. You can search it on GPO’s govinfo. This release covers debates and proceedings of the 92nd through the 96th Congresses.

Photo of US GPO eagle logo

Courtesy Government Printing Off

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873, and is still published today. Click here to learn more.

Library of Congress logo

Courtesy of the Library of   Congress

Issues dating from 1995 (beginning with the 104th Congress) are available online. Many federal depository libraries (like us) will have issues available in print. Current issues become available on Congress.gov shortly after they are published on GPO’s FDsys.

Need more information or assistance in finding congressional information? We love to help! You can reach us by clicking here.

WSL Updates for January 19, 2017

Thursday, January 19th, 2017 Posted in For Libraries, Grants and Funding, News, Technology and Resources, Training and Continuing Education, Updates | Comments Off on WSL Updates for January 19, 2017


Volume 13, January 19, 2017 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) WSL SERVICE CHANGES

2) FREE COMPUTERS – MIA LAB GRANTS

3) PRESERVATION GRANTS FOR SMALLER INSTITUTIONS

4) RECORDINGS AT RISK GRANTS

5) BEYOND GOOGLE – FINDING GOVERNMENT INFORMATION

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

Read the rest of this entry »

50 YEARS OF NORTHWEST HISTORY NEWS NOTES

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017 Posted in Articles | Comments Off on 50 YEARS OF NORTHWEST HISTORY NEWS NOTES


pnq-issues

image courtesy of Pacific Northwest Quarterly

Did you know that for the last 50 years, the Washington State Library has compiled a quarterly bibliography of recent Pacific Northwest history publications, including notable journal articles, for the journal Pacific Northwest Quarterly?

The historian, author, and Washington Room librarian Hazel Emery Mills started the column as a service to researchers of Pacific Northwest history. The first edition of Northwest History News Notes appeared in Volume 58 (January 1967). A staff librarian specializing in Pacific Northwest materials of the Washington State Library has performed this outreach continuously ever since.

The following is a list of the librarians who have produced Northwest History News Notes:

Hazel Emery Mills: Vol. 58 (January 1967)–Vol. 65 (April 1974)

Nancy Blankenship Pryor: Vol. 65 (July 1974) –Vol. 76 (January 1985)

Jeanne Engerman Crisp:  Vol. 76 (April 1985) –Vol. 82 (April 1991)

Gayle Palmer: Vol. 82 (July 1991) –Vol. 89 (Fall 1998)

Shirley Lewis: Vol. 89 (Fall 1998) –Vol. 100 (Fall 2009)

Sean Lanksbury: Vol. 101 (Winter 2009/2010) –current issue.

 

Pacific Northwest Quarterly (PNQ) began as The Washington Historical Quarterly (WHQ) in October 1907, making it 110 years old this year.  All of the Washington Historical Quarterly issues are available online free of charge at https://journals.lib.washington.edu/index.php/WHQ/issue/archive.

PNQ also has a freely accessible online index and a table of contents by issue at http://www.washington.edu/uwired/outreach/cspn/Website/PNQ/PNQ%20Main.html.

You can access physical copies of all WHQ and PNQ issues at the State Library Reading Room or other holding institutions, and you can access PNQ issues published more than five years ago online by JSTOR subscription at http://www.jstor.org/journal/pacnorwestq

For more information, contact the Pacific Northwest & Special Collections Librarian at pnw@sos.wa.gov or 360-704-5279.

You can also contact the Public Services Staff via email, phone, chat, and mail.

 

Pearl Harbor at 75

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services | Comments Off on Pearl Harbor at 75


Pearl Harbor turns seventy-five

USS Arizona Pearl Harbor

Photo of the USS Arizona which fully sank and was never recovered after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Public Domain/Wikimedia Commons.

Only five men are still alive that experienced the Japanese attack on the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. All five are in their mid-nineties. One of them, 96-year-old Lauren Bruner, lives in Washington State.

Yesterday all but one gathered in Hawaii to celebrate Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.

Moments before 8 a.m. on December 7, 1941, the United States was ‘suddenly and deliberately attacked.’ Hundreds of Japanese fighter planes and bombers launched a surprise assault on American soil at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The volley on the U.S. naval base was swift and devastating: 2,403 Americans were killed, and another 1,178 were wounded; American battleships sunk; other ships were irreparably damaged; and almost 200 U.S. aircraft were destroyed.

President Roosevelt delivers his "Day of Infamy" speech to a joint session of Congress on December 8, 1941. (Image source: archives.gov)

The next day, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to formally declare war against Imperial Japan. It was then that Roosevelt spoke those famous words, proclaiming December 7, 1941 “a date which will live in infamy.” America had finally joined WWII. That momentous week of loss and defiance took place seventy-five years ago this month. (Text from Government Book Talk, Dec. 7, 2015)

Based on data collected by the Veterans Affairs the WWII Veterans Museum in New Orleans estimates that only 620,000 of the 16 million Americans — men and women — who fought in World War II remain alive. They are now in their late 80s and 90s. Many, like my father, who served in the Philippines, have died.

While it is true that the Japanese military planned and carried out the attack on Pearl Harbor many Japanese Americans fought for their country, the United States. A favorite of mine is a small federal publication, When the Akimotos Went to War: An Untold Story of Family, Patriotism, and Sacrifice During World War II. The citation is at the end of this article.

The Government Publishing Office makes available a variety of government publications that reference the historic Pearl Harbor attack. You will find many or these listed in the Washington State Library catalog dating from 1946.

Citations

Ching, Shawn. “Last Remaining USS Arizona Survivors Recall Pearl Harbor Attack – Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL.” Home – Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL, www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/33967105/last-remaining-uss-arizona-survivors-recall-pearl-harbor-attack.

Elms, Matthew. When the Akimotos Went to War: An Untold Story of Family, Patriotism, and Sacrifice During World War II. 2015. Available at WSL: Y 3.AM 3:2 AK 5 and online at http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo67846.

Hawkins, Trudy. “‘A Date Which Will Live in Infamy’: Remembering Pearl Harbor.” Government Book Talk | Talking About Some of the Best Publications from the Federal Government, Past and Present, 7 Dec. 2015, govbooktalk.gpo.gov/tag/pearl-harbor/. Accessed 7 Dec. 2016.

Milko, Chelsea. “Pearl Harbor at 75 & Three Pacific Battles That Shaped WWII.” Government Book Talk, 6 Dec. 2016, govbooktalk.gpo.gov/2016/12/06/pearl-harbor-at-75-three-pacific-battles-that-shaped-wwii/. Accessed 7 Dec. 2016.

Shute, Megan. “14 Rare Photos From The Attack On Pearl Harbor.” OnlyInYourState, www.onlyinyourstate.com/hawaii/pearl-harbor-hawaii/.

 

2016 World AIDS Day

Thursday, December 1st, 2016 Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services | Comments Off on 2016 World AIDS Day


Photo of 2016 World AIDS Day logoEach year December 1 is designated World AIDS Day. Beginning in 1988 World AIDS Day has raised awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection. AIDS.gov reports there are 36.7 million individuals worldwide living with HIV/AIDS. 1.8 million are children who were infected by their HIV mothers during pregnancy, child birth or breast feeding.  By far the majority of individuals who have HIV/AIDS live in low- to middle-income countries.

In addition to AIDS.gov, part of the Department of Health and Human Services, nine other units of federal government address HIV/AIDS. The
President’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) identifies six lead agencies charged to implement the strategy. Watch President Obama: Updated National HIV AIDS Strategy.

Federal funding for HIV/AIDS in FY 2016 was $27,465,300 based on a report by the Henry J. 2016 World AIDS Day posterKaiser Family Foundation.

Learn more about HIV/AIDS. You can find federal resources at https://www.aids.gov/federal-resources/. Or ask you Federal Depository Library staff, like us. We serve as the Regional
Federal Depository Library for the states of Washington and Alaska. We want to help you so please contact us.

Locate your nearest Federal Depository Library.

Find graphics and resources.

 

Washington State Library honors Hispanic heritage / Biblioteca del Estado de Washington rinde homenaje a la herencia hispana

Friday, October 14th, 2016 Posted in Articles, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Institutional Library Services, Public Services, Washington Talking Book and Braille Library | Comments Off on Washington State Library honors Hispanic heritage / Biblioteca del Estado de Washington rinde homenaje a la herencia hispana


cropped-ask-wa-mast-small

Información en español

Need assistance finding information? Why don’t you Ask WA?

“Ask WA,” you say.

Ask-WA is a cooperative of more than 60 libraries throughout Washington State, both public and academic, that provide online reference services through chat, email, and instant messaging (IM). This statewide network is tied to a global network that provides access to online reference service, 24/7.

So, when you enter the Ask-WA portal, no matter the day or time, you should readily find help.

If you are a Spanish speaker there is a Spanish portal for you.

Ask-WA es un servicio de chat en línea que lo pone en contacto con un bibliotecario, tanto a nivel local como mundial. En inglés, éste servicio es disponible 24/7 utilizando una red mundial de bibliotecarios profesionales. En español, el servicio no es 24/7, a pesar de una extensa red de bibliotecarios de habla hispana que ofrece asistencia durante la mayor parte del tiempo, especialmente durante la semana.

Para saber si un bibliotecario está disponible para chatear en vivo, por favor, llene el formulario de chat en español de Ask-WA.

Si un bibliotecario no está disponible, usted puede enviar su pregunta por correo electrónico, usted recibirá una respuesta dentro de 48 horas (probablemente mucho antes).

Fiestas Patrias 2016

Fiestas Patrias

Recently staff of the State Library’s Washington Talking Book & Braille Library (WTBBL) staffed a table at this year’s Fiestas Patrias  held at the Seattle Center. State Librarian Cindy Aden was on hand to greet people.

The festival celebrates the independence of  Latin American countries. Belizeans, Brazilians, Chileans, Costa Ricans, Salvadoreans, Guatemalans, Hondurans, Mexicans, and Nicaraguans from all over the Pacific Northwest to gather and enjoy great food, dance, and music.

Fiesta Patrias was a wonderful opportunity for people to become acquainted with the Washington Talking Book & Braille Library. We, in turn, learned more about the communities we want to serve — individuals needing reading and information in non-English languages.

State Librarian Cindy Aden stated, “We take the motto of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, “That All May Read,” seriously. We know that having reading material and information in multiple languages is crucial in our diverse society. I am proud of the efforts of  Washington Talking Book & Braille Library to reach out to the Hispanic community and to have published its first Spanish-language audio book. The State Library has also provides Spanish language support for our AskWA virtual reference service. We are always looking for more ways to make a difference, and we support and  encourage other Washington libraries to do the same”.

WTBBL services are available to all Washington State residents who are unable to read standard print due to one or more of the following conditions:

  • Legal blindness
  • Visual impairment
  • Physical disability causing an inability to turn pages or comfortably hold a book for extended periods of time
  • Deaf-blindness
  • Reading disability due to organic dysfunction

Read more about the Washington Talking Book & Braille Library.

Las bibliotecas de prisiones

Our branch libraries in nine state prisons provide library and information services to inmates many of whom are non-English speakers. In 2014 the Prison Policy Initiative reported that Hispanics made up 14% of the inmates in Washington State prisons and jails. The State Library provides Spanish language material for those for whom English is not their native language. Our branch libraries are “public libraries” for the incarcerated.

ElClubBocados

Publicaciones federales en español

Federal and state publications are published in Spanish and other languages although the majority are published in English. For example, many of the tax materials published by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) are published in Spanish and material for kids such as El Club de los Dos Bocados (Two Bite Plate) published by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service.

Sigue a Will y Anna a probar dos bocados de cada grupo alimenticio y de como se convierten en el Club de los Dos Bocados! Este libro muy colorido introduce los cinco grupos de alimentos de MiPlato a niños pequeños y los motiva a probar alimentos de cada grupo alimenticio. El libro que tiene actividades interactivas tales como narración optional, realce de texto, juegos y activades interactivas, cetificados y páginas para colorear ayudaran a los niños a aprender acerca de MiPlato y una alimentación sana al mismo tiempo que mejora sus abilidades de lectura.

You can borrow the book from the State Library or other federal depository libraries, read it on line, or download it.

Need assistance finding state or federal publications in Spanish? Contact our Ask a Librarian service. We can help you find resources such as these: America’s PrepareAthon! Materials in Spanish from FEMA.

The river of the west: life and adventure in the Rocky Mountains and Oregon

Monday, October 10th, 2016 Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public | Comments Off on The river of the west: life and adventure in the Rocky Mountains and Oregon


Joseph L MeekFrom the desk of Jeff Martin

The river of the west: life and adventure in the Rocky Mountains and Oregon

By: Frances Fuller Victor, 1826-1902

Hartford, Conn: Columbian Book Company

Publication Date: 1870

“Mr. Meek was born in Washington Co., Virginia, in 1810, one year before the settlement of Astoria, and at a period when Congress was much interested in the question of our Western possessions and their boundary. ” Manifest destiny” seemed to have raised him up, together with many others, bold, hardy, and fearless men, to become sentinels on the outposts of civilization, securing to the United States with comparative ease a vast extent of territory, for which, without them, a long struggle with England would have taken place, delaying the settlement of the Pacific Coast for many years, if not losing it to us altogether. It is not without a feeling of genuine self-congratulation, that I am able to bear testimony to the services, hitherto hardly recognized, of the “mountain-men” who have settled in Oregon.. Whenever there shall arise a studious and faithful historian, their names shall not be excluded from honorable mention, nor least illustrious will appear that of Joseph L. Meek, the Rocky Mountain Hunter and Trapper.”

“SUNSET AT THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA..

There sinks the sun; like cavalier of old,
Servant of crafty Spain,
He flaunts his banner, barred with blood and gold,
Wide o’er the western main ;
A thousand spear heads glint beyond the trees
In columns bright and long,
While kindling fancy hears upon the breeze
The swell of shout and song.

And yet not here Spain’s gay, adventurous host
Dipped sword or planted cross;
The treasures guarded by this rock-bound coast
Counted them gain nor loss.
The blue Columbia, sired by the eternal hills
And wedded with the sea,
O’er golden sands, tithes from a thousand rills,
Rolled in lone majesty-

Through deep ravine, through burning, barren plain,
Through wild and rocky strait,
Through forest dark, and mountain rent in twain
Toward the sunset gate;
While curious eyes, keen with the lust of gold,
Caught not the informing gleam,
These mighty breakers age on age have rolled
To meet this mighty stream.

Age after age these noble hills have kept,
The same majestic lines;
Age after age the horizon’s edge been swept
By fringe of pointed pines.
Summers and Winters circling came and went,
Bringing no change of scene;
Unresting, and unhasting, and unspent,
Dwelt Nature here serene!

Till God’s own time to plant of Freedom’s seed,
In this selected soil ;
Denied forever unto blood and greed,
But blest to honest toil.
There sinks the sun; Gay cavalier no more
His banners trail the sea,
And all his legions shining on the shore
Fade into mystery.

The swelling tide laps on the shingly beach,
Like any starving thing;
And hungry breakers, white with wrath, upreach,
In a vain clamoring.
The shadows fall; just level with mine eye
Sweet Hesper stands and shines,
And shines beneath an arc of golden sky,
Pinked round with pointed pines.

A noble scene! all breadth, deep tone, and power,
Suggesting glorious themes;
Shaming the idler who would fill the hour
With unsubstantial dreams.
Be mine the dreams prophetic, shadowing forth
The things that yet shall be,
When through this gate the treasures of the North
Flow outward to the sea.”

Excerpt by Frances Fuller Victor

Washington State Electronic State Publications – The river of the west

Newly Received Federal Publications — April – August 2016

Friday, September 2nd, 2016 Posted in Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public | Comments Off on Newly Received Federal Publications — April – August 2016


Photo of the federal documents staff at the Washington State Library

Federal documents staff at the Washington State Library

The following are publications received during April – August 2016. The purpose of this list is two-fold: one, to create an awareness of the breadth and depth of the Washington State Library’s federal documents collection and two, to alert readers to specific titles available to them either online or through a local federal depository library.

Business

Mineral Commodity Summaries 2016.” USGS Mineral Resources Program. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 July 2016. at At WSL: I 19.166:(1998-). Ask about format. Online at: http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/mcs/2016/mcs2016.pdf. This publication is part of a continuing series and is targeted to all persons in the commodity trades profession.

Culture

Dobkins, Rebecca J., author. Cultural Plant Harvests on Federal Lands: Perspectives from Members of the Northwest Native American Basketweavers Association. United States Department of Agriculture, 2016. Print. Available at WSL! Call No. A 13.78:PNW-RP-608. Also available online at http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo68755/pnw_rp608.pdf and http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/pnw_rp608.pdf.

Photo of cover of Cultural Plant Harvests on Federal Lands.

Pavel, D M, Ella Inglebret, and Stephanie G. Wood. Honoring Tribal Legacies: An Epic Journey of Healing. , 2014. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.2:t 73/2/V.1-2. Also available online: http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo69495/ and http://honoringtriballegacies.com/

United States. National Park Service, issuing body. White House Historical Assocation. The White House Garden Tour. Washington: National Park Service, 2016. Print. Available at WSL! Call no. I 29.2:W 58/12

United States. National Park Service. Office of Communications. United States. National Park Service. Office of Legislative and Congressional Affairs. Harpers Ferry Center (U.S.) United States. National Park Service. Office of Public Affairs. United States. National Park Service. Division of Publications. The National Parks, Index. Washington: The Office of Public Affairs, and the Division of Publications, National Park Service, 1985. Print. This is the 2012-1026 Index.  At WSL: I 29.103:2012-2016. Online: http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/lps125182/2012-2016/NPIndex2012-2016.pdf.

Economy

The Budget and Economic Outlook. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Budget Office, 2010. Print. Available at WSL: Y 10.13:  2016-2026. Online: https://www.cbo.gov/publication/51129. This is the yearly update provided by the CBO for the media and general public understanding and forecasting applications.

Government

Photo of the cover to FBI Story 2015United States. Federal Bureau of Investigation, author. The FBI Story 2015. FBI Office of Public Affairs, 2016. Print. Available at WSL! Call No. J 1.14/2:F 31/6/2015. Online: https://www.fbi.gov/file-repository/the-fbi-story-2015.pdf/view.

United States. Office of the Federal Register. Barack Obama: 2011 (in Two Books). Office of the Federal Register National Archives and Records Administration, 2014. Print. Available at WSL: AE 2.114:2011/BK.2.  Part of the Public Papers of the Presidents series.

United States. Congress. House., and United States. Congress. House. Committee on House Administration. “Telephone Directory.” (1uuu): n. pag. Print. Available at WSL:  MICRO Y 1.2/7:  (Call ahead). Online: https://directory.house.gov/#/. Published for constituencies, public, media and others in need of direct Congressional contact.

Health

United States. Veterans Health Administration,. “Health Care Benefits Overview.” Health Care Benefits Overview. N.p., n.d. Web., 2016 Edition, Vol. 1. Online: www.va.gov/​healthbenefits/​resources/​publications/​hbco.  Focus is upon Veteran health and hygiene.

History

Chapman, Charles W. Letters of Second Lieutenant Charles Wesley Chapman, Jr., December 19, 1894-May 3, 1918. , 2016. Print. Available at WSL: D 301.26/6:C 36; Online: http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo69486/b_0141_chapman_letters.pdf and http://www.au.af.mil/au/aupress/digital/pdf/book/b_0141_chapman_letters.pdf.

Photo of cover of Letters of Second Lieutenant Charles Wesley Chapman, Jr.Dolitsky, Alexander B., editor, author. Hagedorn, Dan, author of introduction, etc. Cloe, John Haile, author of introduction, etc. Glazkov, Victor D., author. Poor, Henry Varnum, 1887-1970, author, illustrator. Pipeline to Russia: The Alaska-Siberia Air Route in World War Ii. N.p., 2016. Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.2:R 92.

Howard, Adam M. Galpern, Steven G. (1969- ). Arab-Israeli Dispute, 1969-1972. Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 2015. Available at WSL: 1.1:969-76/V23. Part of the ongoing series Foreign Relations of the United States, Department of State.

Jones, Marcus O. New Interpretations in Naval History: Selected Papers from the Seventeenth Mcmullen Naval History Symposium Held at the United States Naval Academy 15-16 September 2011. , 2016. Print. Available at WSL: D 208.210:N22.

Mobley, Richard A., 1952- author. Knowing the Enemy: Naval Intelligence in Southeast Asia. Department of the Navy, 2015. Print. Available at WSL! D 221.2:V 67/6. Online: http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo66132/KnowingtheEnemy_508.pdf.

United States. Army Material Command,. The 75th Anniversary of Redstone Arsenal, 1941-2016. N.p.: n.p., 2016. Print.. Available at WSL: D 101.2:R 24/9.

Maps

Hildreth, Wes, and Judy Fierstein. Geologic Map of the Simcoe Mountains Volcanic Field, Main Central Segment, Yakama Nation, Washington., 2015. Internet resource. Available at WSL: I 19.91/3:3315.

United States. Forest Service, cartographer. Motor vehicle use map, Colville National Forest, southeast area, Washington / Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture. [Washington, D.C.] : United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, 2012- Available at WSL:  A 13.28:C 72/8/SOUTHE./ Latest received 2016.

Science

Davis, Raymond J. Northwest Forest Plan, the First 20 Years (1994-2013): Status and Trends of Northern Spotted Owl Habitats. Portland, OR: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, 2016. Print. Available at WSL: A 13.88:PNW-GTR-929. Also online: http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/pnw_gtr929.pdf.

Falxa, Gary A, and Martin G. Raphael. Northwest Forest Plan, the First 20 Years (1994-2013): Status and Trend of Marbled Murrelet Populations and Nesting Habitat. , 2016. Print. Available at WSL: A 13.88:PNW-GTR-933. Also online: http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo70599/pnw_gtr933.pdf and http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/pnw_gtr933.pdf.

Photo of cover of 2015 Science

Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.). “Science Accomplishments of the Pacific Northwest Research Station.” (2001): n. pag. Print. Available at WSL: A 13.66/1:2015. Also online: http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/2015-science-accomplishments.pdf.

Science Findings. Portland, Or: Pacific Northwest Research Station, 1998- .  Available at WSL: A 13.66/19:186. Online: http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/publications/scifi.shtml. The June 2016 issue is titled “Big changes in cold places: The future of wildlife habitat in Northwest Alaska.”

U.S. Nautical Almanac Office. Nautical Almanac 2017. S.l.: U S Nautical Almanac Offi, 2016. Print. Available at WSL! Call no D 213.11:2017

Social Issues

Photo of cover of Within Our Reach publicationU.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, issuing body. Civics Flash Cards for the Naturalization Test. Department of Homeland Security, 2016. Print. Available at WSL! Call no. HS 8.2:F61/2/2016. Also available online at http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo68376/M-623_red_slides.pdf.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, issuing body. Tarjetas De Educación Cívica Para El Examen De Naturalizacíon. N.p., 2016. Print.  Available at WSL! HS 8.2:F 61/2/2016/SPAN. Also available online at http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo68377/M-623-S_red_slides.pdf.

United States. Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities, author. Within Our Reach: A National Strategy to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities. Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities, 2016. Print. Availble at WSL: Y 3.2:C43/5/ST 8. HS 8.2:F 61/2/2016/SPAN. Also available online at http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo66588/PDF%20version/cecanf_final_report.pdf.

Photo of cover of Spinoff 2016Space

Center for the Study of National Reconnaissance (U.S.), author. National reconnaissance almanac / Center for the Study of National
Reconnaissance. Second edition. Chantilly, Virginia : National Reconnaissance Office, 2016. Available at WSL: WSL Federal Documents D 1.2:AL 6/2016.

National, Aeronautics A. S. A. Spinoff Report 2016. S.l.: Natl Aeronautics & Space, 2016. Online http://spinoff.nasa.gov/Spinoff2016/toc_2016.html (read online or download as a pdf )

A yearly ongoing publication. Spinoff features dozens of commercial products derived from NASA technology that are improving everything from medical care and software tools to agricultural production and vehicle efficiency. The companies featured in this year’s publication span a broad range of industries and geographic locations, showing the diverse benefits our Nation enjoys from its investment in aeronautics and space missions. (GPO New Business Publication June 2016)

Tanaka, Kenneth L., cartographer. Geologic Map of Mars. US Department of the Interior; US Geological Survey, 2014. Print.
Available at WSL! Call No- I 19.91/3:3292

Braille

United States. National Park Service,, and Harpers Ferry Center (U.S.),.Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area, Washington. N.p.: n.p., 2012. Print. At WSL: I 29.155:R 67. Visitor Information Brochure.

United States. National Park Service,, and Harpers Ferry Center (U.S.),. Nez Perce National Historical Park, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and Montana. N.p.: n.p., 2015. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.155:N 49  Visitor Information Brochure.

Online Only Publications

Bringing the Future Within Reach: Celebrating 75 Years of the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center, 1941-2016. Available online: http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/gpo67387/20160004991.pdf. 

United States,. “An Act to Adopt the Bison as the National Mammal of the United States.” An Act to Adopt the Bison as the National Mammal of the United States. N.p., n.d. Web. Online: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-114publ152/pdf/PLAW-114publ152.pdf and https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-114publ152/html/PLAW-114publ152.htm.

United States., Smith, W. A., & Rayner, I. (1912). Titanic” disaster: Report of the Committee on commerce, United States Senate, pursuant to S. res. 283, directing the Committee on commerce to investigate the causes leading to the wreck of the White star liner “Titanic,”. Washington: Govt. Print. Off. Available online: http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo66899.

National Parks Service in Washington State (parks, reserves, historic sites, etc.)

Monday, August 8th, 2016 Posted in Articles, Digital Collections, Federal and State Publications, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services, State Library Collections | Comments Off on National Parks Service in Washington State (parks, reserves, historic sites, etc.)


Photograph of Liberty Mountain, North Cascades National Park.

Liberty Mountain, North Cascades National Park. Photo by Jim Culp. Used by permission.

Selected Resources

National Park Service

2016 marks the centennial anniversary of the National Park Service. “That’s 100 years of protecting America’s natural, historical and cultural treasures from all over the United States. These more than 400 beautiful, historic and exquisite sites cover over 80 million acres consisting of approximately 18,000 miles of trails, more than 75,000 archaeological sites and at least 247 species of threatened or endangered plants and animals.” (Text from http://bit.ly/2allmnJ.)

Interior Department National Park System. National Park System (Wall Map Poster). Interior Department National Park System, Print.

A beautiful wall map of the National Parks is available from the Government Printing Office Bookstorehttps://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/024-005-01274-5?ctid=507. “Handsome color map showing the locations of parks in National Park System; suitable for large wall map displays … the map shows all 392 authorized units of the park system. It measures 39 by 29 inches and is of display quality.

Washington State

“National Historic Landmarks Survey / Washington.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. Available online: <https://www.nps.gov/nhl/find/statelists/wa/WA.pdf.>

“National Parks Road Trip: Pacific Northwest.” National Geographic. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016.  Available online: <http://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/road-trips/united-states/washington-national-parks/>.

Covers North Cascades, Mount Ranier and Olympic national parks.

Photograph of data sheet Working with Washington by the Numbers

Working with Washington by the Numbers National Park Service

 

“NHLs in National Parks | National Historic Landmarks Program.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/nhl/find/nhlsinparks.htm#WA>.
Northwest · National Parks Conservation Association.” National Parks Conservation Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.npca.org/regions/northwest>.

Working with Washington by the numbers.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 14 July 2016. <http://bit.ly/2a4PHoO>.

How many national parks are there in Washington State?

National Trails?

National Register of Historic Places?

National Historic Landmarks?

National Natural Landmarks?

World Heritage Sites?

“Want to Browse Some National Park Maps? There’s a Site For That | Smart News.” Smithsonian. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <http://bit.ly/2a4SS0o>. 

Check National Park Maps. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 July 2016, http://npmaps.com/. Free maps of national parks. Check by state.

“Washington: National Register of Historic Places listings in the state of Washington.” Flickr. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalregister/albums/72157620544261128>.

Washington (U.S. National Park Service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 14 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/state/wa/index.htm>.  Find a list of National Park Service designations, a description and a photo.

Photo compilation of National Park Service brochures

National Park Service brochures. Listed in the Washington State Library catalog.

Publications

“Publications (U.S. National Park Service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/aboutus/publications.htm>.
The National Park Service explains decisions, documents information, and shares knowledge through a variety of publications, many of which are available online. This online library includes both contemporary and historical reports.

Periodicals

Virtual Stacks by Topic

NPS Public Databases

(may be useful for casual browsers or serious researchers)

Additional Publications

  • National Parks Index (6.4MB PDF): This index is a complete administrative listing of the National Park System’s areas and related areas.

Braille Books: The National Park Service publishes a series of visitor information brochures in Braille for most of the NPS designated areas in the United States. They are included in this resource list with the designation Print (Braille).

Ebey’s Landing

Photograph of Ebey's Landing. Photo by James Marvin Phelps.

Ebey’s Landing. Photo by James Marvin Phelps.

Evans-Hatch, Gail E. H. Evans-Hatch, D. Michael. Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve: Historic Resources Study. Washington: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, 2005. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.58/3:W 57.

Polenz, Michael. Slaughter, Stephen L. Dragovich, Joe D. Thorsen, Gerald W. Geologic Map of the Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Island County, Washington. Olympia N.p., Washington State Dept. Print. Available at WSL: 2 copies, one in library use only WA 33.7 G291ope 2005-2 2005 c.1 ; available for circulation  WA 333.7G291ope 2005-2 2005 c.2.

United States. National Park Service. Ebey’s Landing: Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Washington. Washington: National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, 2008. Print (map). Available at WSL: I 29.2:EB 3/2.

United States. National Park Service, author. Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2015. Print (Braille). Available at WSL: I 29.155:EB 3.

Gilbert, Cathy. Reading the Cultural Landscape: Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. Seattle: National Park Service, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Cultural Resource Division, 1985. Print. Online at: http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS115589.

Photograph of a building on Officers Row, Fort Vancouver, Vancouver, Washington.

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Officers Row, Vancouver, WA

Fort Vancouver

Hussey, John A. Fort Vancouver National Historic Site/washington. Denver: Denver Service Center, National Park Service, 1972-1976. Print. Available at WSL: I 29.2:F77.

United States. National Park Service, author. Fort Vancouver: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2013. Print (Braille).
Available at WSL! I 29.2:F 77 v/2/ v.1, I 29.2:F 77 v/2/ v.2.

Tip: check our catalog for author John A. Hussey to find other studies he did of Fort Vancouver.

Lake Chelan

Northwest Interpretive Association. North Cascades National Park Service Complex (Agency : U.S.). Imus Creek Nature Trail, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. Seattle: The Assn., 1998. Print. WSL Northwest Collection NW 917.975 IMUS 1998?

Tip: See also North Cascades National Park.

“Welcome to Stehekin.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/upload/Stehekin-Map-2010.pdf>.

Lake Roosevelt

Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area, Washington. Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, 2005. Print (map). Available at WSL: I 29.39:R 67.

 Mount Rainier

“An icon on the horizon.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/mora/index.htm>.

Mount Rainier National Park: Washington. Washington, D.C.: The Service, 1973. Print (Maps). Available at WSL: Historic Research R 912.7977 United 1973.

 “Publications – Mount Rainier National Park (U.S. National Park Service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/publications.htm>.

Tahoma News
The Mount Rainier National Park “Tahoma News” is printed each winter, spring, summer and fall. Look inside for descriptions of seasonal activities, current events and facility hours … read the most recent edition on-line or receive a printed copy when you arrive at the entrance gate to the park.

United States. National Park Service, author. Mount Rainier, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2016. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:M 86 R/2.

North Cascades National Park (and surounding areas)

Johannessen, Tracie B, Wendy Scherrer, Saul Weisberg, and Nikki McClure. North Cascades National Park: A Living Classroom : a Guide to Field Trips and Activities in Ross Lake National Recreation Area and North Cascades National Park. Sedro-Wooley: North Cascades Institute, 1996. Print. Available at WSL: NW OVERSIZ 917.9773 JOHANNE 19.

“North Cascades are calling.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/index.htm>.

“North Cascades National Park Complex.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. Available online at <https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/NOCAmap1.pdf>.

“North Cascades National Park Complex Stephen Mather Wilderness.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/Wilderness-Trip-Planner-2016-05-06_01-for-web.pdf>.

 North Cascades National Park Service Complex. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 July 2016. <https://www.facebook.com/NorthCascadesNationalPark/>.

Popular Trails: Featuring Trails in North Cascades National Park & Ross Lake National Recreation Area. Seattle: Northwest Interpretive Assn., 2000. Print. Available at WSL: NW 917.975 POPULAR 200-?.

“Surrounding region.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. Available online at: https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/NOCAmap2.pdf.

“State route 20 detail map.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/SR-20-Detail.pdf.

Photograph of greenery in a rain forest of the Olympic National Park

Rain Forest Greenery along the shores of the Quinalt River. Photograph by Alan posted to Flickr. Used by copyright permission.

Olympic Mountains

 “Olympic National Forest – Maps & Publications.” US Forest Service. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016.

Olympic National Park, Washington. Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, 1939- . Print (Maps). Available at WSL: I 29.6OI 9/3 1939-2003 some issues missing.

“Olympic National Park Guide.” Sunset. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2016. <http://www.sunset.com/travel/northwest/olympic-national-park-washington>.

United States. National Park Service, author. Olympic: Olympic National Park, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2015. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:OL 9.

Ross Lake National Recreation Area

“Ross Lake National Recreation Area.” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service). N.p., n.d. Web. 7 July 2016. <https://www.nps.gov/noca/planyourvisit/upload/rosslake_6-08.pdf>.

Tip: See also North Cascades National Park

Photo of the Crook house with family on the porch from Jim Crook House, San Juan Island.

Crook House historic structures. English Camp, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan Island, Washington

San Juan Island

Erigero, Patricia, and Barry Schnoll. Crook House Historic Structures Report: English Camp, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan Island, Washington. Seattle: Cultural Resources Division, Pacific Northwest Region, National Park Service, 1984. Web.  Available at WSL:  I 29.88:C 88. Available online through the Library’s Washington Rural Heritage project: bit.ly/29X2ZEs

United States. National Park Service, author. San Juan Island National Historical Park, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:SA 5 J/2.

Whitman Mission

United States. National Park Service, author. Whitman Mission National Historic Site, Washington. National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL: I 29.155:W 59.

United States. National Park Service. Whitman Mission, Sitio Histórico Nacional, Washington.  N.p.,  Print. Available at WSL:
I 29.6/6:W 59/SPAN.

Photograph showing the Whitman Mission historic site with the Oregon Trail and Mission Monument

Site of the Whitman Mission National Historic Site. Photograph by Glenn Scofield Williams as found on Flickr. Used by copyright permission.

Washington and Other States

Klondike Gold Rush

United States. National Park Service. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Seattle, Washington. Washington: National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1981. Print (map). Available at WSL: I 29.6:K 69/W 27.

United States. National Park Service, author. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Skagway, Alaska. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! I 29.155:K 69

United States. National Park Service, author. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Skagway, Alaska. N.p., 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL: I 29.155.G29.

Lewis and Clark

United States. National Park Service, author. Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks, Oregon / washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2014. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! I 29.155:L 58

Mcloughlin House Fort Vancouver

United States. National Park Service, author. Mcloughlin House Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Oregon/washington. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 2013. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:M 22

Manhatten Project National Historical Park (Oak Ridge, TN, Los Alamos, NM, and Hanford, WA)

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Natural Resources. Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation, author. H.r. 1208, to Establish the Manhattan Project National Historical Park in Oak Ridge, Tn, Los Alamos, Nm, and Hanford, Wa: Legislative Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation of the Committee on Natural Resources, U.s. House of Representatives, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, First Session, Friday, April 12, 2013. N.p., 2014. Web. Available at WSL: WSL Annex (Call ahead) Y 4.R 31/3:113-10, MICRO Y 4.R 31/3:113-10 ; Available online at <http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo47105> <http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo47106>.

Manzanar

United States. National Park Service, author. Manzanar, Manzanar National Historic Site, California. National Park Service US Department of this Interior, 2016. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! Call No. I 29.155:M 31/2

Minidoka

United States. National Park Service, author. Minidoka, Minidoka National Historic Site, Idaho/washington. National Park Service, US Department of the Interior, 2016. Print (Braille). Available at WSL! I 29.155:M 66/2

Nez Perce

United States. National Park Service. Visitor Guide: Nez Perce National Historical Park, Big Hole National Battlefield, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington.  Lapwai: Nez Perce National Historical Park, 2009.  Print.  Available at WSL: I 29.2:N 49/2 2009

Photograph of logo banner of the Listen Up! oral history program.

Listen Up! North Olympic Library System. Oral histories from the Washington Northwest corner. Used by permission of the North Olympic Library System. Project supported by the Washington State Library Washington Rural Heritage Project using federal Library Services and Technology Act funds administered by the Institute for Museum and Library Services.

 Oral History

Listen up! Stories from the Northwest corner. A series of oral histories collected by staff of the North Olympic Library System from residents of Clallam County sharing their stories about National Parks. There are 16 recorded interviews plus a compilation video.